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OBI56

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OBI56 last won the day on July 22 2011

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About OBI56

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    TO-92 Transistor

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  1. Rodney, I'm going by memory here. The Flexy was "designed" back in the early 70s (probably by some hippy on an LSD trip) and its design flew in the face of conventional logic and everything else out there. 2 schools of thought where stands are concerned: make it as solid and inflexible as possible or make it flexible enough to absorb all sorts of vibrations. It was not designed by scientists or engineers but by hobbyists whe found out, probably by accident, that it worked wonders for many cases where conventional stands were so solid that they passed all the vibrations on to the equipment. The main reason for its popularity back then and for the renewed interest today is its cheap cost, simplicity, ease of assembly by someone with limited tools or woodworking experience and because it looks "cool". There is nothing scientific about a Flexy; it is all seat of the pants, DIY based on what worked back then. Today, as back then, the typical house floor is wooden based/framed, not poured concrete, so it flexes and vibtates from everything from footfalls to the washing machine spin-drying to trucks passing outside; not to mention subwoofers exciting the floor's natural resonant frequency. The Flexy is not a commercial product (though I'm sure someone tried to commercialize it at some point), has not been patented (to my knowledge); much like the old bifold doors on cinder blocks shelving units or beds set on stacked plastic milk crates to make room for a desk underneath it so popular in dorm rooms. I'm sure that someone, somewhere has done some scientfic study on the flexy to prove or disprove why it works the way it does. Remember when Bod first came out with the Amazings and everyone screamed that the science behind them was totally bogus and that it was impossible that it could work, but it still does work. You want to argue about it; go ahead and knock yourself out, but I stand by the old saying: The results speak for themselves.
  2. You don't need a brace for the flexi. There's a big difference between "you don't need to" and "never brace a Flexy". I'm curious, too. OK Bill, you got me! The theory behind the flexy stand is that it is in balance as it is designed. Bracing it, presumably on the back, throws the balance out of wheck and can result in it not absorbing and distributing vibrations in a symmetrical fashion. Hence, it no longer works the way it was designed.to. Building it the way Mike did with thicker than specified threaded rods also stiffens the stand to the point that it becomes rigid and to lose the inherent "flex" that is what absorbs the vibrations. Adding steel or aluminium tubes to cover the threaded rods may look nice but also defeats the purpose of the Flexy stand design and turns it into a regular stiff stand. I've built more than a few of these in the past 40 years and tried a;; of the "improvements" such as braces, back panels, tubes, rubber washers, etc... and none of them sounded the same or worked as well as the original design. An original Flexy works wonders under a tube amp or turntables, seriously cleaning up the microphonics of those big tubes. Mike also has his on a solid concrete floor; Flexys were designed for use on springy hardwood or carpeted floors. But, as with everything in this hobby, your results may vary depending on what your goals are.
  3. You don't need a brace for the flexi. There's a big difference between "you don't need to" and "never brace a Flexy". I'm curious, too. OK Bill, you got me! The theory behind the flexy stand is that it is in balance as it is designed. Bracing it, presumably on the back, throws the balance out of wheck and can result in it not absorbing and distributing vibrations in a symmetrical fashion. Hence, it no longer works the way it was designed.to. Building it the way Mike did with thicker than specified threaded rods also stiffens the stand to the point that it becomes rigid and to lose the inherent "flex" that is what absorbs the vibrations. Adding steel or aluminium tubes to cover the threaded rods may look nice but also defeats the purpose of the Flexy stand design and turns it into a regular stiff stand. I've built more than a few of these in the past 40 years and tried a;; of the "improvements" such as braces, back panels, tubes, rubber washers, etc... and none of them sounded the same or worked as well as the original design. An original Flexy works wonders under a tube amp or turntables, seriously cleaning up the microphonics of those big tubes. But, as with everything in this hobby, your results may vary depending on what your goals are.
  4. Looks like a Flexy; you never brace a Flexy, otherwise it won't work right!
  5. Very nice Mike! I should get down to the garage and take a picture of my system there too.
  6. I'm a bit lost here with the split-up thrads thing, but I have enough amps for now I guess ..... but for some reason I have a C-1 which is getting lonely upstairs without a matching amp to power that spare set of Morduant Shorts ....
  7. Congrats Rodney! First the Monoblocks, now the travel mug. Some guys have all the luck .... LOL!
  8. Interesting item Rich. Where did you find it? BTW, in please.
  9. I bought a pair of RCA Command Series 5751's which another user of the CD327A said were awesome, but I haven't tried them yet. I'll post an update when I get a chance. It most likely won't be until the summer. I'm pretty busy at work and home right now. OBI, that's really neat that you took the CD327's and had people compare! I live about 10 blocks from the show venue so it was easier for me to bring in my 2 burned in units than for Ian to burn-in 2 identical units just for the show. I was so enamoured by the sound improvement from the Psvane tubes that I was pretty sure that just about ant listener could hear the difference within 30 seconds so I offered Ian and Rachel to conduct the test at the show on their behalf. BTW, I told Ian that he would not be seeing his preamp back; spoke to Rachel and bought it outright, color be damned! Also, all the information and pricing is now up on their site. No black units will be available unless there is a large demand for them.
  10. Thanks! I was quite disapointed with the Squeezebox until I hooked it up with some $300 ICs, then it sounded pretty decent. Bypassing its internal DAC and hooking it up to my CityPulse DAC stepped things up several notches but it sounded best through my GF Tube DAC-09 which unfortunately has to go back upstairs in my office system to drive one of my cubes. It still doesn't measure up to my CD-327A soundwise (it lacks that last little bit of detail and soundstage to measure up); probably never will, but for most non-critical music listening, it works just fine and much better than my old NAD CD player ever did.
  11. Well, after 2 years of searching for a new preamp to front my Sunfire 300-2 I finally came across the perfect sounding unit at last week's SSI show in Montréal; a Jungson HeDo WC-1 that I left the show with. Grant Fidelity premiered the line at the show and what first struck me was the incredibly silent, black background it has, unlike every other preamp I heard at the show. It really amazes me that reputable, high end companies will put out products that are so obviously noisy, noisy enough to be audible at a noisy show venue, let alone in a home environment. When I got it home, I immediately found it to be everything I had been looking for; quiet, smooth, liquid and detailled without any fatigue whatsoever. It took me a while to notice that it was missing a few of the features I had on my short list but oddly enough the sound has a way of making then no longer seem so necessary anymore. A week later and it is getting even better sounding with the bass really starting to deepen even more. This one is a keeper! I also recently added a Squeezebox Touch to my main system, resting on the preamp in the photo.
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