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B-Man

Removing scratches and blemishes from CDs

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Just thought I'd share something I tried on a whim. I have been ripping my entire CD collection again into FLAC files and noticed that the PC was having a hard time with Jackson Brown - Running On Empty. I ejected it and discovered that it had a pretty long scratch running diagonally from the center hole almost to the outer edge. yikes.gif

 

I figured that there was nothing to lose, so I grabbed a microfiber cloth and some of this from the garage :

 

SHOW-CAR-GLAZE-image.jpg

 

I use it to take hazing and small scratches out of vehicle paint so how bad can it be, right ?? 

 

Not to go too hard against the common consensus (which is to not rub a CD in a circular motion) I put a little of the glaze on the rag and rubbed it in a circular motion until I could no longer see the scratch. Actually, it was still faintly visible from an angle but I figured it would be better than it was. I wiped all of the residue off and it looked 100% better.

 

I threw it back into the drive and JRiver ripped it with no errors or retries.  emteeth.gif

 

I'm sure if the scratch is deep enough it wouldn't help because it is not a very aggressive polish, but for the light stuff and stubborn smudges it sure does the trick.

 

Smells like bananas to boot !!!
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Good show Brian.  I wonder about the differences between the lasers used on units now in comparisons to the ones when they first came out.  I remember a demo done when cd's first came out.  A cd was taken and a fine sand paper was run across it to put scratches in it and then played in the cd player and it played flawlessly.  Even cd's that had pretty deep scratches in them played without fail.  Nowadays, it doesn't take much at all for it to skip, etc.  I wonder if the lasers are cheaply made and less stronger than in the good ole days?  Opinions?

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"less stronger"

 

emwink.gif
 
as in not as strong a signal beam or  Whatever the reason, the units today and for some time are more sensitive to cd's than on the onset IMO.  I don't speak Anunnaki so I can't translate  happy0009.gif

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A CD consists of a thin aluminum or gold data layer sandwiched between 2 polycarbonate discs.
Data is written as a series of pits and lands (1's and 0's) in a spiral track beginning at the center with the TOC.
If the data track were laid out linearly it would be more than 3 miles long. 
 
If a CD refuses to "boot up" it's likely the lead-in track containing the table of contents has been damaged. 
Polishing/refilling/reflowing the polycarbonate can be effective if the data layer has not been comprimised.
Pits are closer to the label side of a disc, so CDs are more likely to suffer damage on the label side of the disc.
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Just thought I'd share something I tried on a whim. I have been ripping my entire CD collection again into FLAC files and noticed that the PC was having a hard time with Jackson Brown - Running On Empty. I ejected it and discovered that it had a pretty long scratch running diagonally from the center hole almost to the outer edge. yikes.gif
 
I figured that there was nothing to lose, so I grabbed a microfiber cloth and some of this from the garage :
 
SHOW-CAR-GLAZE-image.jpg
 
I use it to take hazing and small scratches out of vehicle paint so how bad can it be, right ?? 
 
Not to go too hard against the common consensus (which is to not rub a CD in a circular motion) I put a little of the glaze on the rag and rubbed it in a circular motion until I could no longer see the scratch. Actually, it was still faintly visible from an angle but I figured it would be better than it was. I wiped all of the residue off and it looked 100% better.
 
I threw it back into the drive and JRiver ripped it with no errors or retries.  emteeth.gif
 
I'm sure if the scratch is deep enough it wouldn't help because it is not a very aggressive polish, but for the light stuff and stubborn smudges it sure does the trick.
 
Smells like bananas to boot !!!
Circular motion is OK according to Zappa:
 
An' that got me just about as evil as an Eskimo boy can be...

So I bent down 'n I reached down 'n I scooped down

An' I gathered up a generous mitten full of the deadly...

YELLOW SNOW

The deadly Yellow Snow from right there where the huskies go

(Over by Butzis' room)

An' then I proceeded to rub it all into his beady little eyes

With a vigorous circular motion
Hitherto unknown to the citizens of Canarsie,

But destined to take the place of THE MUD SHARK

In your mythology

THE VIGOROUS CIRCULAR MOTION...

Here it goes, RUB IT!

(HEY... HEY... HEY...)

 

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 I tried using a special CD polish once and as careful as I was, I ended up making very light scratches in the disc. The original idea from the seller was to make perfectly flat, the surface that the laser had to read. Looking back it sounds like just another sales product. In the case of an already damaged CD, the polishing idea is More Better. Ummm, just trying to fit in guys.

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groupshot_small.jpg
 
 "...

NOVUS PLASTIC POLISHES
THE PROFESSIONAL AND EXPERT CHOICE

Since NOVUS first introduced NOVUS Plastic Polishes in 1973, the number of plastic products has grown tremendously. Yet, as widely used as plastic is, many people are still not sure how to care for it. This website can help.

By using a few simple techniques, along with NOVUS Plastic Clean & Shine No. 1, NOVUS Fine Scratch Remover No. 2 & NOVUS Heavy Scratch Remover No. 3, you can actually add life to plastic and keep it looking new. Best of all, you don't have to be a pro to get professional results.

Try our polishes and you'll see why manufacturers of plastic/acrylic products have used and recommended NOVUS Polishes for years.

NOVUS has been the best kept secret for years, but the word has gotten out to millions of people that NOVUS can restore and clean your plastic/acrylic products. NOVUS Polishes have saved manufacturers and consumers millions of dollars over our 30 years in business.

Don't settle for anything but the very best!..."

 
 

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Lyman,
 
  I am supposing that it worked on the TT cover. The question that I might have is about the many different plastics and how they would respond to a polish. 

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groupshot_small.jpg
 
 "...

NOVUS PLASTIC POLISHES

THE PROFESSIONAL AND EXPERT CHOICE

Since NOVUS first introduced NOVUS Plastic Polishes in 1973, the number of plastic products has grown tremendously. Yet, as widely used as plastic is, many people are still not sure how to care for it. This website can help.

By using a few simple techniques, along with NOVUS Plastic Clean & Shine No. 1, NOVUS Fine Scratch Remover No. 2 & NOVUS Heavy Scratch Remover No. 3, you can actually add life to plastic and keep it looking new. Best of all, you don't have to be a pro to get professional results.

Try our polishes and you'll see why manufacturers of plastic/acrylic products have used and recommended NOVUS Polishes for years.

NOVUS has been the best kept secret for years, but the word has gotten out to millions of people that NOVUS can restore and clean your plastic/acrylic products. NOVUS Polishes have saved manufacturers and consumers millions of dollars over our 30 years in business.

Don't settle for anything but the very best!..."

 
 
 
I haven't tried Novus on CD's but it's great for nasty turntable dust covers and badly scratched M-500 meter acrylic.
Removing deep scratches takes a lot of effort though so I recommend using a low or variable speed orbital buffer.
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HERE ARE JUST A FEW USES FOR NOVUS POLISH

  • DVD's, Video Games, CD's
  • Auto Headlamps, Interiors, Gauges, Chrome, & Acrylic Paints
  • Microwave Oven Doors, Decorator Acrylic Refrigerator Panels
  • Motorcycle Windscreens, Visors, Fairings & Helmets
  • Snowmobile Windshields, Helmets, & Hoods
  • Acrylic Hot Tubs & Spas
  • Boat Windows & Fiberglass
  • Salad Bar Sneeze Guards
  • Emergency Vehicle Light Bar Lens Covers
  • Plastic Storm Windows & Skylights
  • Collapsible Windows on Convertibles & Sport Utility Vehicles
  • Turntable Dust Covers, Stereo Faceplates
  • Acrylic, Fiberglass or Cultured Marble Tubs, Showers & Counters
  • Acrylic Aquariums
  • Telephones, Pagers, Scanners
  • Acrylic Trophies & Awards
  • Plastic Display Cases & Signs
  • Gauges & Instrument Control Panels
  • Safety shields & Goggles
  • Airplane Windows
  • Video Games, Pinball Machines & Jukeboxes
  • Copiers and Fax Machines
  • Acrylic Furniture
  • Cash Registers & Calculators
  • Acrylic on Tanning Beds

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Thanks Lyman for the link to the Novus product. I have been looking for a product to try to clean up a Pioneer TT dust cover. I'm also curious to see how it may work on some window panels on my Wife's Jeep.

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Thanks Lyman for the link to the Novus product. I have been looking for a product to try to clean up a Pioneer TT dust cover. I'm also curious to see how it may work on some window panels on my Wife's Jeep.
 
Be careful if you use a variable speed orbital buffer as recommended by Zumbini.  Friction heat does nasty things to a TT cover.  How do I know you ask?  I just do.
 
 
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I use this:  JFJ Easy Pro DVD/CD Cleaner.  
 
I have had it for at least 3 years.  Does a beautiful job.  I bought over a 1000 CD's on Craig's list that did not come in cases.  They were in bad shape.  Some were saved by this machine if all the damage was on the non print side.  If the damage is on the print side there is no hope.  
 

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