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danowood

Amazing feat of yesteryear's

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To imagine the creativity, the engineering and the man hours to create this machine is short of astonishing.  The wages paid for the work done is phenomenal. Of course advanced methods of construction has made it more economical, etc.  But it all starts somewhere and it's nice to look at the past to see where ideas come from.
 
 
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The neat thing is that when I was younger there where still shops around that could make big stuff like that. Of course the locomotive industry was gone but some of those machine tools lived on. I can remember as a teen riding the table on one of those big planners as we did setups and such and than running the machine. What fun it was standing in front of a row of control levers and having control of a machine that you could park a truck on and making huge chips. Same with the verticle lathes. Later I would service machine tools and make repairs on some of these machines. Very cool stuff indeed.
 I still get into a few shops where they used to build bridges and such, massive buildings with huge cranes and most of the lighting from windows. There is a cool factor as I walk through them knowing what was going on in there a hundred or more years ago.
 
BillWojo
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Did anyone notice that around 1:30 they were pouring molten metal and the guy standing close by gets splashed and he wipes it away. Too much. No Personal Protective Equipment; like eye and face protection. Those must have been real men in those days. LOL
 
Very neat to watch.
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That was a great video!

 

Living in Baltimore, the B&O roundhouse museum, which is now part of the Smithsonian Institute, has a relatively new repair facility where they refurbish steam engines! Before they built the new facility, they had been repairing them for years! I always enjoy going there with just grandsons when they are in town!

 

An aside, the original B&O RR line originated at where Camden Yards (was rail yard before Oriole Park) is located, the other terminus was Ellicott Mills (Ellicott City). The original line was a horse drawn train where at the midpoint they would change teams of horses! The name of that little town is Relay, that is where I grew up!

 

Bicentennial year 1976, they re-enacted the Thom Thumb race!

That was a lot of fun! There is a lot of local history which I find fascinating!

 

I encourage anyone visiting the area to check out the roundhouse museum!

 

BarryG

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Zack and I visited the B&O Railroad Museum in 2002 before the roof collapsed during a snow storm.

About 10 years later we visited again with his Boy Scout troop after it had been restored and upgraded.

It's a very impressive collection! 

 

I knew it was a National Historic Landmark but did not know it had an affiliation with the Smithsonian.

 


 

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The affiliation came through the restoration after the roof collapse! I think feder grant money tied them to the smithsonian! I used to hold a family annual pass to the B&O .

 

A lot of things were damaged from that collapse , that was one hell of a snowstorm! Snow was chest deep in my area! My car disappeared under the snow for more than a week! I am so glad we had a working fireplace and lots of wood!

 

BarryG

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While we're on the subject of trains and museums I highly recommend the Illinois Railway Museum in Union, IL.
About an hours drive from Chicago, it features the largest collection of transportation-related vehicles in the US.
Zack and I visited at least a dozen times and he never got tired of it.
 
 

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   All I could think of when watching the video (apart from being amazed) is just how friggin loud it must have been! Those machines had to rumble squeal, howl, chatter, well you get the idea. Could have used some Dolby C or something...

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