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Rod H

What do you do for a living?

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  Many of you already know I have been a Master Automotive Technician for some 35+ years now, with some management of Monro, Midas and Firestone stores thrown in for good measure. Did Aviation Mechanic duties for a Sikorsky sub-contractor in CT, too.
  Can't stand customers, though. People say they want the cheapest repair job possible, but then complain about performance or longevity later. I actually told a frustrating tire customer at Firestone "Sir, the only thing cheaper than these tires is you." No big bosses ever got wind of that, thankfully. I always made more money as a flat rate tech than the managers anyway.
   Now, my back is really bad, so I only do that 3 days a week or less, fix/flip audio gear the other days as the pain allows. A bone spur inside one of my vertebrae prevents surgery. My goal is to get into something less physical, but still maintaining a reasonable salary. Not easy to find.
   I have been selling just about anything on eBay and other sites since 2001. I once sold three mice, dead for decades, nothing left but bones and fur, but perfectly intact. Found them in a 1927 console radio. $15.00. I have no idea what anyone would do with them...
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Started out as a Union Carpenter...(18yrs)  In 1990 helped Bechtel remodel the U.S.Embassy in Moscow for 16 months. Which led to my first obsession with Carver Audio. I've been a Boilermaker since 1999..Work on Nukes, Oil Refineries and Fossil plants..all over the U.S. and Canada. So when you push the power switch on your Carver gear (or others) and a Big Smile comes across your face  Big Grin   I help make that happen.....

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I once sold three mice, dead for decades, nothing left but bones and fur, but perfectly intact. Found them in a 1927 console radio. $15.00. I have no idea what anyone would do with them...
 
It must be a dream-come-true for a Taxidermist. happy0009.gif 

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I once sold three mice, dead for decades, nothing left but bones and fur, but perfectly intact. Found them in a 1927 console radio. $15.00. I have no idea what anyone would do with them...
 
It must be a dream-come-true for a Taxidermist. happy0009.gif 

WTF...  You didn't happen to call them "RAT" and someone though it was a 427 chevy?happy0009.gif

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Sr code monkey I get to fling poo at underlings..

 

Sr software engineer 20 years.

I get to integrate all the cool toys.

 

Design Engineer 18 years EDM

Electrical Discharge Machines.

Lots of analog fun, Big power switching (kilo watts) high frequency.

 

While in school worked at TV audio repair shop. Really enjoyed that!

 

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Shipping/receiving and inventory control for the past 17 years. Worked in Cable TV for 14 1/2 years prior and 7 years in grocery prior to that. Groceries anyone?

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I have been in the automotive dealership management biz for many years. I tried getting out of the auto biz a couple times but it always sucked me back in. I am currently at a Ford dealership and still loving the job. My "hobby" job is repairing Carver Amazing ribbons, Martin Logan electrostats, and modifying Polk Audio SDA speakers.

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"Poo Flinger"  Damn I want that on my resume! emteeth.gif
 
Aren't all Dog-owners "PooFlingers" by trade?  happy0009.gif
 
 
 
Don't forget us cat owners! Or rather, we're owned by our cats.  Can't help it!
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I have made Electricity for my career, 35 years of it for 2 different companies.  I have worked as an Instrumentation Technician at coal and gas fired generating plants. Retiring as the Instrument Supervisor for the last 7 years July 3rd 2017.  
 
John 
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I manage a small electrical engineering group at a medical device development organization. I've worked there about 15 years. Before that I worked in industrial instrumentation in various positions for over 20 years.

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I'm an electrical engineer. I work as a product designer for a sensor group of Nidec motor company in Ohio. I work from my home office/lab in California.

 

One of my first jobs was with the Delco Electronics division of General Motors. I was tasked with doing a full reverse engineering of the noise reduction board in a Carver TX-11.

 

I enjoy doing electronic repairs and troubleshooting as a hobby. I like solving puzzles, and electronic repairs are pretty good puzzles.

 

Some of the notable systems I've repaired include a sensor problem under a Titan III missile at Vandenberg AFB, and fixing an intermittent runaway motion problem on the Carousel at the Cirque du Soleil Show O at Bellagio in Las Vegas.

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  Now, if I were to work on a runaway problem at the local carousel, things might turn out to be more amusing...
 
  I also like to solve problems, at least within my limitations. As it is, I have been more of a parts changer for awhile with electronic projects. It so happens that when we step out of the circle, that is where we can discover something new that shouldn't have worked according to the norm. I drove my first boss a little more crazy by inventing new solutions not covered in the Bell manual.

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Boring-Boring

 
Understudy for Garde Manger-Saucier-Baker-Sous Chef for 15 years (old School) have my paper's in all disciplines and have been an Executive Chef and restaurant owner. Two best days of my life was when I opened and when I sold.eusa_think.gif Started at the age of 15. Was the first non European Chef invited to perform and cook for the Dallas performing Arts Gala 1982 (TACA Dinner) to benefit the performing arts . Along the way set up UFOC (Uniform Franchise Operating Codes) for many restaurants such as Pizza Hut-Joes Seafood-and others. Trained all the broiler (steak) cooks and franchise owners in kitchen operations for Steak Ale back in the 60’s.
Now I am the purchasing agent for Marriott Hotel. Everything from toilet paper to steaks, kitchen equipment to beds. I do get to work closely with the culinary staff and Chef’s on new recipes and ingredients which is fun but the pay sucks and the hours long but I do get benefits such as Insurance for myself and Susan and substantial room discounts at all our brands.
 
20170419150855434.jpg 
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I've been a mechanic all of my life... Started out as a helicopter mechanic in the Army and found a job working on Baltimore City Police helicopter for a shot while. Got fired! I was dragging my azz getting my A&P licence and me and the boss didn't really hit it off.
In 1986 I started working at a Honda dealership and never looked back. My wife and I own a Honda/Acura repair shop. It's just me and her, we've had the shop for 19 years now....and at the shop we get to jam out most every day... Got my Klipsch KP-362's being powered by a Carver TFM-42Party!Oh yea we rock out at the shop
 
 
 
MCP:-) 
 
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Well, this has been a fun read! So much talent here!
 
 
I spent 19 years in Aviation..
I have an FAA Airframe and Powerplants license, an FCC General Radio/telephone Operators License, and a years of experiences. 
Joined the Navy at 17 and got may basic electronics training there just after Carter was sworn in.
Did 4 years, got out and wandered around for a while.
Did some college, built some houses, learned some cabinetry, consumed some intoxicants.
Connected with an Aircraft Defense Contractor and was with them for 15 years.
Traveled the world and lived in several locations in the US. Had a blast!
But the last gig was a drag and I started looking for something else.
Ended up in Medical Imaging Service. 
The first company fired me after 5 years, the second company (hospital system) contracted us out after another 5 years and I now work for a contractor doing the same job for the same hospital system I was working for. Fixing their x-ray equipment.
I plan on retiring before this contract runs out in another 5 years.
 
 
 
 
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I work in a paper mill in Menasha WI. I work in fiber prep & load pulpers to feed 4 paper machines. I work southern swing shift & have one weekend a month off! so next time you wipe your ass you can thank the people working 24 hours 7 days a week to make the paper so you can do that! :-)

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I'm serving time as a Quality Assurance Engineer at a contract manufacturer specializing in electronics - mostly circuit board assemblies - for military, industrial and commercial applications. I've been here for 4 years. 
 
Previously, I worked 41 years in manufacturing management and program management in electronics manufacturing at a major US company that is now only a shell of its former self - but that's business.
 
I've been fortunate to have been close enough to the industry that I've had exposure to the evolution that has taken place in electronics manufacturing from 1970 until now. The changes are radical, but I do still love it...( for now!) emwink.gif
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Semiretired,  Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) Contractor, drilling under rivers and oceans shore landings installing transmission distribution pipelines.

 

Been fortunate, HDD is a process my father is credited with inventing which was the start of a whole new industry (trenchless). Between my father and I we are named as the inventors of 24+ HDD patents, foundation in which the industry is built. Been fortunate to be a part of and watch 42+ year of HDD evolution. Aside from our specialty of large scale project, even the trenchless utilities you see being installed today where spawn from this single idea and invention.  

 

Monopolized the industry from 1972-1979 until receiving an offer that could not be refused (father not me) and sold the company, entering a 5 year noncomplete. Designed and manufactured HDD equipment until 1982 when we reentered the HDD contracting business.  In 1990 father and I decided we could not work together, prompting me to take my equity in equipment and starting my own company in the southern hemisphere (South East Asia) focusing on countries no one wanted to go i.e. Bangladesh, India, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Indonesia, etc, etc. Offices in 4-5 countries, home office Singapore, moving it to Sydney Australia around 2001.  

 

Over the years has been some great successes and setbacks, it all washes out in the end, no regrets.  Now semiretired, providing HDD consulting, and trying to be more proficient at my earning than my wife is at her spending.

 

I like the Bob Carver story, one I can relate. Some Carver equipment is a diamond in the rough, out preforming the high-end gear to this day, hence the Carver rejection and stonewalling over the years from segments  of the industry.  

 
My first encounter with Bob Carver gear I was too young and naive to know at the time. Came off a big project in my early-mid 20s and decided I needed a stereo system. Going to the local hi-end audio shop I ask for the latest and greatest, coming home with a Phase Linear 4000 preamp, 400 amplifier, JBL speaker, etc. Was not until some years ago I learned PL was Bobs gear. Damn wish I would not have given it to my brother!  
 
 

I know nothing about electronics but enjoy a challenge (workshop therapy), Carver equipment and the Bob Carver story. Hence all of the questions and help request. Just trying not to electrocute myself while netting a positive result…lol

 
In Closing, there have been some very nice, experienced and helpful members (which I am eternally grateful) advising that some information I seek can be found in the Service Manual. I assure all I read (a lot). It’s not the reading part I struggle, it’s the competition of electronics I struggle to grasp. Whoever knew Ohm’s had a Law!  Must have missed those classes.     
 
 

   

 
Below a cable laying ship preparing to feed fiber optic cable into shore landing pipe we installed. Hundreds of miles of cable on this ship, prepairing to lay the first 3500 feet, then onward, out to sea.
20170616104531701.jpg
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