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Worthless Information For Those Who Want To Know

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Filk Music

Filk is a musical genre that grew out of the science-fiction and fantasy fan community. During the early days of science-fiction conventions, many participants would gather for late-night singing sessions. The phenomenon has since spread to include professional recordings and conventions devoted entirely to filk. Though filkers have been known to write songs about a variety of topics, most songs reference specific works of fiction or cultural aspects of fandom. How did the genre get its name?

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Luciano Pavarotti (1935)

Originally a schoolteacher, Pavarotti only began his vocal training in his 20s but nevertheless became one of the most successful tenors of all time. He made his professional debut in 1961 and then debuted at La Scala in 1965 and the Metropolitan Opera in 1968. A popular favorite, Pavarotti was noted for the rich and ringing clarity of his voice as well as for his immense personal charm. At the peak of his career, his concerts drew hundreds of thousands of attendees. Where did he last perform?

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3 hours ago, oldtexasdog said:

Luciano Pavarotti (1935)

Originally a schoolteacher, Pavarotti only began his vocal training in his 20s but nevertheless became one of the most successful tenors of all time. He made his professional debut in 1961 and then debuted at La Scala in 1965 and the Metropolitan Opera in 1968. A popular favorite, Pavarotti was noted for the rich and ringing clarity of his voice as well as for his immense personal charm. At the peak of his career, his concerts drew hundreds of thousands of attendees. Where did he last perform?

 

”On 10 February 2006, Pavarotti sang "Nessun dorma" at the 2006 Winter Olympics opening ceremony in Turin, Italy, at his final performance. In the last act of the opening ceremony, his performance received the longest and loudest ovation of the night from the international crowd. Leone Magiera, who directed the performance, revealed in his 2008 memoirs, Pavarotti Visto da Vicino, that the performance had been recorded weeks earlier.[27] "The orchestra pretended to play for the audience, I pretended to conduct and Luciano pretended to sing. The effect was wonderful," he wrote. Pavarotti's manager, Terri Robson, said that the tenor had turned the Winter Olympic Committee's invitation down several times because it would have been impossible to sing late at night in the subzero conditions of Turin in February. The committee eventually persuaded him to take part by prerecording the song.”

Nessun sincronizzazione labiale. 🤫

 

 

 

Edited by dcl
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Maybe not worthless information - but timely...

 

A division of FEMA publishes statistics fires related to cooking.  On this annual "Darwin" cooking activity, there is a spike (last bullet).  What is the activity likely driving that spike?

 

From their statistics:

Capture.thumb.JPG.82a3f611b1efa60303e829615d80bf5a.JPG

 

Hint:

 

Bonus question: What state has the most turkey fryer accidents?

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COAL ASH IS MORE RADIOACTIVE THAN NUCLEAR WASTE


DECEMBER 16, 2010 LAUREN STANFORD 

 

Coal ash, the waste produced by coal plants, is actually more radioactive than that generated by their nuclear counterparts. In fact, the coal ash emitted by a power plant—a by-product from burning coal for electricity—carries into the surrounding environment 100 times more radiation than a nuclear power plant producing the same amount of energy.

 

At issue is coal’s content of uranium and thorium, both radioactive elements. They occur in such trace amounts in natural, or “whole,” coal that they aren’t a problem. But when coal is burned into coal ash, uranium and thorium are concentrated at up to 10 times their original levels.

 

Coal ash is currently exempt from toxic waste rules and instead can be reused in almost limitless applications under the “beneficial use” rule. Around the country, it’s used, unmonitored, in road construction and to some extent in running tracks, including at schools. It’s used to make everything from carpets to fertilizer to cinder blocks, and sometimes gypsum board and roofing shingles.

 

The EPA is being urged at a minimum to adopt the hazardous waste classification for coal ash when it decides between the proposals currently under consideration.  A decision from the EPA related to fly ash classification is expected in early 2011.


http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste

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51 minutes ago, RichP714 said:

COAL ASH IS MORE RADIOACTIVE THAN NUCLEAR WASTE


DECEMBER 16, 2010 LAUREN STANFORD 

 

Coal ash, the waste produced by coal plants, is actually more radioactive than that generated by their nuclear counterparts. In fact, the coal ash emitted by a power plant—a by-product from burning coal for electricity—carries into the surrounding environment 100 times more radiation than a nuclear power plant producing the same amount of energy.

 

At issue is coal’s content of uranium and thorium, both radioactive elements. They occur in such trace amounts in natural, or “whole,” coal that they aren’t a problem. But when coal is burned into coal ash, uranium and thorium are concentrated at up to 10 times their original levels.


http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste

Why aren't they capturing it and using it for fuel in Thorium or fast breeder Uranium reactors? Uranium is as rare as Plutonium and Thorium is everywhere!

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Mars Makes Its Closest Approach to Earth in Nearly 60,000 Years (2003)

In its most favorable position for viewing, when it is opposite the Sun, Mars is twice as bright as the brightest star in the sky. The Red Planet was even more visible in 2003, when it made its closest approach to Earth in nearly 60,000 years, passing within 35 million mi (56 million km) of us. An email sent during the 2003 approach has spawned hoax emails saying that during an upcoming approach Mars will appear as big as the Moon. When is the next time Mars will be as close as it was in 2003?

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George Eastman Receives a Patent for His Kodak Camera (1888)

Eastman was an American industrialist, inventor, and philanthropist. Interested in photographic processes from an early age, he invented roll film in 1884 and perfected a camera designed to use it, called the Kodak camera. In 1892, he established the Eastman Kodak Company and began to mass produce his inventions, transforming photography from an expensive hobby of the few to a relatively inexpensive, popular pastime. What was his contribution to the development of motion pictures?

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He invented celluloid roll film.

On 8/27/2019 at 12:42 PM, oldtexasdog said:

Mars Makes Its Closest Approach to Earth in Nearly 60,000 Years (2003)

In its most favorable position for viewing, when it is opposite the Sun, Mars is twice as bright as the brightest star in the sky. The Red Planet was even more visible in 2003, when it made its closest approach to Earth in nearly 60,000 years, passing within 35 million mi (56 million km) of us. An email sent during the 2003 approach has spawned hoax emails saying that during an upcoming approach Mars will appear as big as the Moon. When is the next time Mars will be as close as it was in 2003?

 

NASA says that won’t happen again until 2287. 

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John Cage (1912)

Cage was an American avant-garde composer and writer. In the 1930s, he began writing all-percussion pieces and proclaimed the use of noise as the next musical horizon. In 1938, he introduced the "prepared piano," an instrument whose sound is radically modified by various objects placed on the strings. He developed the idea of indeterminacy, music that is not strictly controlled. The notorious 4'33", probably his most famous piece, consists of 4 minutes and 33 seconds of what?

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The Mary Celeste

In 1872, the Mary Celeste, a brigantine merchant ship, was discovered drifting in calm seas in the Atlantic Ocean—unmanned and apparently abandoned. The crew's disappearance is considered especially unusual because the ship was seaworthy when found, its cargo was still intact, there was an ample supply of food and water on board, and there were no clear signs of foul play. The case remains one of history’s greatest maritime mysteries. What are some theories about the crew’s disappearance?

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On 9/5/2019 at 9:11 AM, oldtexasdog said:

The notorious 4'33", probably his most famous piece, consists of 4 minutes and 33 seconds of what?

 

I admit curiosity got the better of me, on this one, so I cheated, and looked it up.  

 

The answer can be found by quoting Simon and Garfunkle:

Hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within the sound of silence

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1 hour ago, Brian_at_HHH said:

 

I admit curiosity got the better of me, on this one, so I cheated, and looked it up.  

 

The answer can be found by quoting Simon and Garfunkle:

Hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within the sound of silence

=D=

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18 hours ago, Brian_at_HHH said:

I admit curiosity got the better of me, on this one, so I cheated, and looked it up.  

[…]

 

Nothing wrong with looking it up.  Research is not cheating (unless you are taking the ACT, SAT, GMAT, LSAT, or paying to get your kids into UCLA - LoL!)

 

Research to learn something you didn't know is respected, and an effective way to go beyond just "existing and consuming."  Sets a super example, I think.

 

Research, reading, and learning is always a better way than the alternative of hyperbole,...

Edited by AndrewJohn
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Colloquially, using hyperbole in conversation, and today in social media, has become commonplace.  Ironically, this concept or malady (whatever you feel like calling it) has been studied and well documented by psychologists, philosophers, scientists/researchers who study logic, legal experts, human behavior scientists, and daily by lawyers in courts trying to find the truth. 


The human nature to use "faulty generalization" has been a source of failure in the news and entertainment lately, and in history (remember Orson Welles 1938 radio drama "War of the Worlds" that caused widespread panic).  My mother was a college English teacher, and my brother and sisters and I had our proverbial knuckles cracked regularly, for such misuse of language.  I still fail, regularly, and am guilty of making faulty generalizations from time to time.

 

Defined, 'Faulty Generalization' "is a conclusion about all or many instances of a phenomenon that has been reached on the basis of just one, or just a few instances of that phenomenon.  It is an example of jumping to conclusions. For example, we may generalize about all people, or all members of a group, based on what we know about just one or just a few people. […] Faulty generalizations may lead to further incorrect conclusions. Expressed in more precise philosophical language, a fallacy of defective induction is a conclusion that has been made on a basis of weak premises. Unlike fallacies of relevance, in fallacies of defective induction, the premises are related to the conclusions yet only weakly buttress the conclusions. A faulty generalization is thus produced. This inductive fallacy is any of the several errors of inductive inference.

 

(I cite Wikipedia for most of this text above and below, the definition in my Freshman logic class textbook is less clear!)

 

I like the list of synonyms for the Faulty Generalization that are cited in Wikipedia:

  • Hasty generalization
  • Illicit generalization
  • Fallacy of insufficient sample
  • Generalization from the particular
  • Leaping to a conclusion
  • Blanket statement
  • Hasty induction
  • Law of small numbers
  • Unrepresentative sample
  • Secudum quid

When referring to a generalization made from a single example, it has been called "Fallacy of the lonely fact."

When evidence is intentionally excluded to bias the result, it is sometimes termed the "fallacy of exclusion" and is a form of selection bias.

 

No follow-up question on my "Worthless Information" piece here..., just something that I keep in mind when watching the news, these days. Click 👍 if it sparks thought for you. 

 

Some just call it "Bull Shit."  LoL 😉 

 

Edited by AndrewJohn
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2 hours ago, AndrewJohn said:

 

 

Some just call it "Bull Shit."  LoL 😉 

 

 

Condensed version of "Faulty Generalization"

 

Example:

"Truth isn't  truth" ….Rudy Giuliani  O.o

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2 hours ago, AndrewJohn said:

.....When evidence is intentionally excluded to bias the result, it is sometimes termed the "fallacy of exclusion" and is a form of selection bias.

 

No follow-up question on my "Worthless Information" piece here..., just something that I keep in mind when watching the news, these days. Click 👍 if it sparks thought for you. 

 

Some just call it "Bull Shit."  LoL 😉 

 

 

Logical fallacies are rampant, unfortunately (unless you were a star in debate club); it's very hard to engage someone in actual conversation anymore; One of my favorites:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I'm_entitled_to_my_opinion

 

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Solar Sails

The electromagnetic radiation carried by solar wind exerts pressure on surfaces that absorb or reflect it. Though small, this force can be harnessed and used as a form of space propulsion requiring no fuel. Solar sails are lightweight, highly reflective devices that harness this force and, when attached to spacecrafts, may be used to modify their orbits, perform fine trajectory corrections, and even drive interplanetary flights. Has a working solar sail ever been successfully tested?

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31 minutes ago, oldtexasdog said:

Has a working solar sail ever been successfully tested?

 

IIRC, there was a successful test done very recently.  Definitely an interesting technology, and fun to see it transition from being an old time SciFi favorite to somethng real, and viable.  🙂

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2 hours ago, Brian_at_HHH said:

 

IIRC, there was a successful test done very recently.  Definitely an interesting technology, and fun to see it transition from being an old time SciFi favorite to somethng real, and viable.  🙂

Speaking of sailing technology, here is a look at a technology that could change the shipping business and make sailing easier for average people.

 

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1 hour ago, iamjohngalt said:

Speaking of sailing technology, here is a look at a technology that could change the shipping business and make sailing easier for average people.

 

Now THAT looks cool!  That really has some neat potential.  And the boom might even be a bit padded so when it smacks you in the head, you don't come too 6' under water (don't ask me how I know what that's like :$).  Thanks!

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