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RAID anyone ??

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54 minutes ago, Daddyjt said:

 

Min an earlier post you mentioned RAID5 is a nightmare... could this five drive array be used as a RAID 10 (that you said was the ideal)?  

 

Do you get to choose the RAID method, or is it pre-determined based on the hardware?

 

sorry for the dumb questions, but I am learning a great deal in this thread. 

 

Typically any of these RAID boxes will support different RAID configurations you can choose.  The spec's on them usually state what RAID configurations they support

 

RAID 5 is not a total nightmare, but it is more techy.  Greg's advice is sound.  Or, dig in, learn it, and be happy, like me.  😉

 

One thing to clarify...,  

 

Most of these boxes are "hot-swappable." That means, as a drive degrades, you can pull it out, and replace it, without turning off the power.  Which means if something is accessing/using the drive, it will work fine during the several hour long (or days) rebuild process of the replaced drive.

 

You can only replace one drive at a time, as in, it requires the others to be there to rebuild the redundant data from.  Remove two simultaneously - and your are hosed.  After a disk drive failure, a common a human error is to not watch the console and ensure the drive rebuild process is complete, before changing another drive out.    

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1 hour ago, Daddyjt said:

 

Min an earlier post you mentioned RAID5 is a nightmare... could this five drive array be used as a RAID 10 (that you said was the ideal)?  

 

Do you get to choose the RAID method, or is it pre-determined based on the hardware?

 

sorry for the dumb questions, but I am learning a great deal in this thread. 

 

The hardware determines what RAIDs it will support. The specs on anything you buy should detail what it supports. Typically, if it supports RAID 5, it will also do RAID 1 and 0. Remember too that you can allot drives into different arrays. Take for instance the 5 drive NAS. You could dedicate 3 of those drives to RAID 5, and 2 of the others to RAID 1 (mirror). You can also create virtual drives. That is, you can allot storage space on the RAID 5 array into different virtual disks, so if you wanted say, drive A to be for pictures, and drive B to be for music, you can give your pics say 8TB and your music say 2TB. They are both on the same physical RAID array, but PCs will see Drive A (my pics) and Drive B (my music) on the network. The Synology you specified supports all the RAIDs we mentioned, so no worries.

 

Synology DS1515+

 

I will never recommend RAID 5 ever again. I have seen too many RAID 5 arrays get fucked. With RAID 6 now, and HUGE drives available nowadays, it makes little sense to use RAID 5 anymore. Keep in mind that typically when a drive goes down, the drives are near or at their end of life. Even after you replace the bad drive, you have to wait for the array to rebuild itself (which could take many hours, or even days). The bigger the single drives, the longer the rebuild takes. If another drive goes down during the rebuild, it's goodbye data. RAID 6 can handle another drive failing, even during rebuild. You sacrifice some storage, but you greatly increase fault tolerance. Notice too that both RAID 1 and RAID 5 have the same fault tolerance - 1 drive. The ONLY reason to go with RAID 5 or 6 is if you need a shitload of storage in one place.

 

Mirror is the best RAID for storage of critical data (RAID 1 or 10). Most commercial servers use RAID 10 for websites like this. There is no rebuild time - you just replace the bad drive and it's rebuilt in minutes. Even better, like what I use, is RAID 1 on a file share backup. My share on a different physical NAS has the same data as my RAID 1 on my PC. My fault tolerance is effectively 2 drives, and no fuss with RAID 5 crap.

 

 

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Regardless of whatever way anyone goes, and any of the options are better than a single disk), no matter how much redundancy you have on a unit, it dos NOT mean you don't need a backup - there's no such thing as a device that can't fail and totally corrupt your data.  Always have a backup, and make sure you test that you can get things back from your backup.  If I had a penny for every time I've seen an untested backup that didn't work when needed, I would have a full set of the Bob-father's latest creations in every room.

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A number of years ago I bought a large 20 bay server. Supermicro IIRC, unit is buried and will take some effort to get to. Dual CPU dual power supply. Initially installed 4-6 either 1 or 2 TB drives, with the intention of expanding as needed, to use as a server primarily for storage of a large music and movie collection. It's been so long I've forgotten what RAID it is set up for but I'm thinking 5, 6, or 10.

 

Had a computer service place install Win Server 2008. They didn't configure something correctly so I couldn't access the any of the drives from the network. Spent a little time with Windows servers for dummies and couldn't figure it out. About this time my job went to 6 10s and project got shelved.

 

I'd like to get this beast doing the job it was purchased for instead of collecting dust. My plan is to use JRiver for the media client. The house will have 2 networks one connected to internet and the one with this server connected without internet access so an OS that no longer gets security updates is OK. My goal is to be able to access the data stored on the server from any room in the house through ethernet cable and be able to watch a movie in 1 room and listen to the stereo or watch another in another room.

 

I'm open to any assistance and more than happy to take the discussion to PM.

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4 hours ago, Packratt said:

I'm open to any assistance and more than happy to take the discussion to PM.

 

If nobody else jumps to your assistance, let me know.  I don't tend to have a ton of time, and Doze is not my favorite, but I can certainly give it a shot - I do enough server meddling, and it doesn't sound like your planned use is too tough - being on a separate network means you can easily skip the hassles of setting up the PITA security.

 

Step 1 - get yourself about a 5lb mallet.  That's for when the system aggravates you  -  just tap it in your hand and tell the computer "You're going to behave this time, aren't you!"

 

Realistically, step one is digging it out, and getting it fired up.  Let us know when you have some semblance of life, and we can go from there.

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@Brian_at_HHH I'm sorry! And @AndrewJohn...

 

RAID 5 is a bad memory for me...the only thing personal is that it affected my personal life more than once! RAID 6 was my savior for mass video storage. We're talking 76TB, 84TB, 124TB pools of data, and some were clostered in groups of servers that had automatic fail-over and such. Thank God most if that was RAID 6.

 

I guess it's one of the preference things of tech - once something causes such pain and suffering you just can't trust it anymore.

 

@Packratt That's a cool idea. Windows 2008 is very complex, so don't feel bad. I hope you guys can fix it though. I'm available for some tips as well.

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No worries @Nahash5150 I don't disagree about R5 - it definitely has it's foibles, but there is a bit of a difference between the video system and a small home NAS.  Most of them are going to be 4-disk units, and if the owner wants any real quantity of storage, R6, 10 or mirroring is going to eat so much space they will just abandon it and opt for stiping instead.  The biggest worry I have for most people, and I've been bitten on my own with this is just not noticing when a drive has failed, or not having a spare. Sadly, I'm guilty on both, but I lucked out and the other drives held until I got a new drive and rebuilt things.

 

For my work, I do run IT SANs, but I have two that are then mirrored on top  - but I have seen R5 systems go South in ugly ways, hence my suggestion, back it up.  Any file that's only in one place is something you don't care about- it's as good as deleted.  😀

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All of my storage units have email notifications, so monitoring shouldn't be a problem as long as you get a unit that offers that.

 

It comes down to storage versus fail tolerance and what you're willing to do. If all your stuff needs RAID5 capacity, your backup has to be just as robust.

 

Hence, so many RAID failures I've delt with because it was relied upon solely.

 

There's much to consider in all these weeds. :D

 

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I'm not wedded to Win Server 08.

 

My initial thought was that the AV server software would be running on the server and would need an OS capable of this.

 

I now realize the AV server software runs off the local machine and accesses the server for data.

 

I had the OS installed on a SSD and it the drive could easily be swapped for another with a different, more suitable, user friendly OS installed.

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18 minutes ago, Packratt said:

I'm not wedded to Win Server 08.

 

I would suggest you choose the OS that you are most comfortable with - just make sure there are drivers available to support the RAID board it has.  Having the OS on a separate drive is likely the best option for you.  Just remember that many non-server OS' from Seattle based companies limit the number of active connections you can have.  That may not be an issue to you, but best to be aware.  Treat it as a fun project, and don't let the bits get the best of you.

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