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Nine-Year-Old Cynthia Ann Parker Kidnapped by Comanches (1836)

Parker was a young girl when Comanches raided Fort Parker—located in what is now Texas—and massacred its inhabitants, capturing her in the process. Raised by her captors, she was adopted into the tribe and went on to bear the last great Comanche chief, Quanah Parker. At first, Quanah led raids on frontier settlements, but after his defeat and surrender, he learned to live alongside his white neighbors and eventually became the richest Native American in the US. What became of his mother?

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Nine-Year-Old Cynthia Ann Parker Kidnapped by Comanches (1836)

Parker was a young girl when Comanches raided Fort Parker—located in what is now Texas—and massacred its inhabitants, capturing her in the process. Raised by her captors, she was adopted into the tribe and went on to bear the last great Comanche chief, Quanah Parker. At first, Quanah led raids on frontier settlements, but after his defeat and surrender, he learned to live alongside his white neighbors and eventually became the richest Native American in the US. What became of his mother?
 
 
Cynthia Ann Parker, or Naduah (meaning "someone found" or "Keeps Warm With Us") was "rescued" at age 34, by the Texas Rangers. She spent the remaining 10 years of her life refusing to adjust to life in white society. At least once she escaped and tried to return to her Comanche family and children, but was again brought back to Texas. She had difficulty in understanding her iconic status to the nation, which saw her as having been redeemed from savages. Heartbroken over the loss of her family, she stopped eating and died of influenza in 1870.
 

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It's a Wonderful Life.........a film I've still never seen.
 
How is that possible??
 
 
Never saw E.T. either, and don't care to. 
 

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It's a Wonderful Life.........a film I've still never seen.
 
How is that possible??
 
 
I haven't seen it either. I frequently notice that I have not seen many of the movies & TV shows I hear folks discussing. I tend to lean towards documentaries and hunting / fishing / outdoors type shows when I do watch TV. 
 

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Emile Berliner (1851)

After apprenticing as a printer in Germany, Berliner immigrated to the US and became interested in the new audio technologies of his day. He patented a series of improvements to Alexander Graham Bell's recently invented telephone before turning his attention to the phonograph. In 1888, he introduced the first flat disc recording, a marked improvement over Thomas Edison's recording cylinders for the phonograph and a precursor of the modern record. What were some of Berliner's other inventions?

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Emile Berliner (1851)

After apprenticing as a printer in Germany, Berliner immigrated to the US and became interested in the new audio technologies of his day. He patented a series of improvements to Alexander Graham Bell's recently invented telephone before turning his attention to the phonograph. In 1888, he introduced the first flat disc recording, a marked improvement over Thomas Edison's recording cylinders for the phonograph and a precursor of the modern record. What were some of Berliner's other inventions?
 
Berliner's other inventions include a new type of loom for mass-production of cloth; an acoustic tile; and an early version of the helicopter. According to a July 1, 1909, report in The New York Times, a helicopter built by Berliner and J. Newton Williams of Derby, Connecticut, had lifted its operator (Williams) "from the ground on three occasions" at Berliner's laboratory in the Brightwood neighborhood of Washington, D.C.
 
In fact between 1907 and 1926, Berliner dedicated himself to improving the technologies of vertical flight through the development of a light-weight rotary engine, which he improved upon throughout the 1910s and 1920s. With R.S. Moore, also a Scientist and Inventor, as his chief assistant, Berliner obtained automobile engines from the Adams Company in Dubuque Iowa, manufacturer of the Adams-Farwell automobile. This car used air cooled three or five cylinder rotary engines which were developed in-house by Fay Oliver Farwell (1859-1935). Berliner and Farwell adapted them for use in perfecting “machines” produced for vertical flight. His realizations allowed him to move away from the heavy in-line engines to lighter rotary models, which led to the invention of a 6-hp rotary engine for the improvement of vertical flight. It was these experiments that led to the formal creation of the Gyro Motor Company in 1909. And it was the creation the 6-hp rotary engine that initiated the use of rotary engines in aviation. The Gyro Motor Company manufactured these and other improved versions of the Gyro Engine between 1909 and roughly 1926. The building used for these operations exists at 774 Girard Street, NW, Washington DC, where its principal facade is in the Fairmont-Girard alleyway.
 
By 1910, continuing to advance vertical flight, Berliner experimented with the use of a vertically mounted tail rotor to counteract torque on his single main rotor design. And it was this configuration that led to the mechanical development of practical helicopters of the 1940s. When the Gyro Motor Company opened, Spencer Heath (1876–1963), a mechanical engineer (among other things), became the manager. Heath was connected with the American Propeller Company, also a manufacturer of aeronautical related mechanisms and products in Baltimore, Maryland. Both R.S. Moore, Designer and Engineer, and Joseph Sanders (1877–1944), inventor, engineer, and manufacturer, were involved in the original operations of the company. Berliner was president of the newly founded Gyro Motor Company and much of his time was spent dealing with business operations. which merged to become Berliner-Joyce Aircraft.
 
On July 16, 1922, Berliner and his son, Henry, demonstrated a working helicopter for the United States Army. Henry became disillusioned with helicopters in 1925, and in 1926 founded the Berliner Aircraft Company, which merged to become Berliner-Joyce Aircraft in 1929.
 
Berliner, who suffered a nervous breakdown in 1914, was also active in advocating improvements in public health and sanitation. 

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Project Habakkuk

It seems like pure folly to build a ship—let alone a giant aircraft carrier—out of ice, but during World War II, that is exactly what inventor Geoffrey Pyke proposed the Allies do. While plain ice—the kind put in drinks—is not strong or durable enough for such a task, Pyke believed a composite material made of wood pulp and ice would be. For much of 1943, a multinational team based in Canada toiled to realize a ship made of pykrete—a portmanteau of Pyke and concrete. Did the project succeed?

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Project Habakkuk

It seems like pure folly to build a ship—let alone a giant aircraft carrier—out of ice, but during World War II, that is exactly what inventor Geoffrey Pyke proposed the Allies do. While plain ice—the kind put in drinks—is not strong or durable enough for such a task, Pyke believed a composite material made of wood pulp and ice would be. For much of 1943, a multinational team based in Canada toiled to realize a ship made of pykrete—a portmanteau of Pyke and concrete. Did the project succeed?
 
Later that year (1943) Habbakuk began to lose priority. Mountbatten listed several reasons:
  • The great demand for steel.
  • Permission had been received from Portugal to use airfields in the Azores which facilitated the hunting of U-boats in the Atlantic
  • The introduction of long-range fuel tanks that allowed British-based aircraft extra patrol time over the Atlantic
  • Increased numbers of escort carriers
  • Mountbatten himself had withdrawn from the project.
The final Habbakuk Board meeting took place in December 1943 and it was announced that "The large Habbakuk II made of pykrete has been found to be impractical because of the enormous production resources required and technical difficulties involved".
 
The use of ice had actually been falling out of favour before that, with other ideas for "floating islands" being considered, such as welding Liberty Ships or landing craft together (Project TENTACLE). It took three hot summers to completely melt the prototype constructed in Canada.
 
Perutz, in his account, writes that he sojourned in Washington D.C. while U.S. Navy engineers evaluated the viability of Habbakuk. He concludes: "The U.S. Navy finally decided that Habakkuk was a false prophet. One reason was the enormous amount of steel needed for the refrigeration plant that was to freeze the pykrete was greater than that needed to build the entire carrier of steel, but the crucial argument was that the rapidly increasing range of land-based aircraft rendered floating islands unnecessary." 
 

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Siraitia grosvenorii: Longevity Fruit

While empirical studies have yet to show that the fruit of the Siraitia grosvenorii vine extends life, anecdotal evidence—the sheer number of centenarians living in Guangxi, China, where the plant is primarily cultivated—has led some to draw this conclusion. Used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat things like heat stroke and sore throats, the fruit only recently caught the attention of Western scientists. What have studies of its medicinal properties shown thus far?
 
20130525072143267.jpg

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Anyone remember those old Marconi HF radios?  The one's with the precision calibrated length of waxed string running the pulleys that moved the dial?

 

We had to 'pre-stretch' the string with Xlbs of weight for IIRC 72 hrs; it was a pain to thread onto the pulleys; you'd often snap the string, but if it stretched past its calibrated length, the radio dial would be off;

 

fun times

 



The final solution is for the desperate, and should only be used for thermal intermittent faults where all other avenues of analysis have already been explored. Be warned that this technique can cause secondary damage, but it usually does positively identify the original fault.
 

Cover the radio with a fire blanket to block off all ventilation.

 

cool0016.gif  eusa_dance.gif 


 



Fit a thermometer or thermocouple probe in the airspace under the blanket at the top of the chassis.
Run the set until the air temperature reaches about +75ºC (use +65ºC if your chassis uses waxed capacitors or coils, or was originally built with second grade components).
 


Open the blanket slightly at the bottom, and try to stabilise the temperature at this figure.


 

Stay with the radio, monitor it very carefully and leave it to run until something fails.

 

Usually, what fails is the cause of your original intermittent fault, but normally the failure will now be permanent, and therefore traceable. 

 

You really must be present all throughout this test, and have a suitable fire extinguisher readily to hand



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Anyone remember those old Marconi HF radios?  The one's with the precision calibrated length of waxed string running the pulleys that moved the dial?
 
We had to 'pre-stretch' the string with Xlbs of weight for IIRC 72 hrs; it was a pain to thread onto the pulleys; you'd often snap the string, but if it stretched past its calibrated length, the radio dial would be off;
 
fun times

 

Quote
The final solution is for the desperate, and should only be used for thermal intermittent faults where all other avenues of analysis have already been explored. Be warned that this technique can cause secondary damage, but it usually does positively identify the original fault.
 
 
Cover the radio with a fire blanket to block off all ventilation.
 
cool0016.gif  eusa_dance.gif 
 
 
Quote
Fit a thermometer or thermocouple probe in the airspace under the blanket at the top of the chassis.

Run the set until the air temperature reaches about +75ºC (use +65ºC if your chassis uses waxed capacitors or coils, or was originally built with second grade components).

 

Open the blanket slightly at the bottom, and try to stabilise the temperature at this figure.

 
 
Stay with the radio, monitor it very carefully and leave it to run until something fails.
 
Usually, what fails is the cause of your original intermittent fault, but normally the failure will now be permanent, and therefore traceable. 
 
You really must be present all throughout this test, and have a suitable fire extinguisher readily to hand
 
 
Sounds like fun times, its amazing how much the development of rubber and nylon/plastic has impacted our everyday lives......   

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Mutant Cockroaches Evolve Bait Avoidance Mechanism

Cockroaches have survived and thrived on Earth for hundreds of millions of years, but the hardy pests do—or at least did—have one fatal flaw: a sweet tooth. For years, humans have exploited this weakness in their efforts to fight cockroach infestations, baiting the pests with glucose-coated insecticide. Unfortunately, it seems that at least some German cockroaches have evolved a protective aversion to glucose, perceiving it as bitter rather than sweet.

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Film Crews

Working behind the scenes of on-camera talent, film crews are a vital part of the moviemaking process, taking care of such things as production, art, hair and makeup, cameras, sounds, visual effects, and lighting. Many of the positions within the crew have special names. For example, lighting and rigging technicians are known as grips. The key grip heads the department and works with the director of photography to arrange lighting and blocking. The best boy, also on the lighting team, does what?

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Film Crews

Working behind the scenes of on-camera talent, film crews are a vital part of the moviemaking process, taking care of such things as production, art, hair and makeup, cameras, sounds, visual effects, and lighting. Many of the positions within the crew have special names. For example, lighting and rigging technicians are known as grips. The key grip heads the department and works with the director of photography to arrange lighting and blocking. The best boy, also on the lighting team, does what?
 
There are two kinds: best boy electric and best boy grip. They act as assistants to (respectively) the gaffer and key grip. Best boys act as foremen for their respective departments. 
 

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I all way's liked the term "Best Boy" but wondered how you went home and told your Mother and Dad the title or a new date you met????
 
20130603165102640.jpg

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Musk

Used as a popular perfume fixative since ancient times, musk is an odorous substance obtained from a gland of the male musk deer. Its strong odor comes from the organic compound muscone. Musklike substances are also obtained from the muskrat and the civet, and even some plants yield oils that resemble musk. Since musk deer are often killed to extract the gland, ethical concerns—as well as economic ones—have led to the production of synthetic musk. Why has this also come under scrutiny recently?

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Musk

Used as a popular perfume fixative since ancient times, musk is an odorous substance obtained from a gland of the male musk deer. Its strong odor comes from the organic compound muscone. Musklike substances are also obtained from the muskrat and the civet, and even some plants yield oils that resemble musk. Since musk deer are often killed to extract the gland, ethical concerns—as well as economic ones—have led to the production of synthetic musk. Why has this also come under scrutiny recently?
 
 
Synthetic musk
Galaxolide.svg.pngEnlarge picture
Galaxolide, a polycyclic musk commonly found in laundry detergents to mask the smell of the

detergent chemicals. It is also the aroma compound in laundry detergents

responsible for giving washed laundry the "clean scent" that consumers have

learned to expect.

 

Since obtaining the deer musk requires killing the endangered animal, nearly all musk fragrance used

in perfumery today is synthetic, sometimes called "white musk". They can be

divided into three major classes — aromatic nitro musks, polycyclic musk

compounds, and macrocyclic musk compounds.[3] The first

two groups have broad uses in industry ranging from cosmetics to detergents. However,

the detection of the first two chemical groups in human and environmental

samples as well as their carcinogenic properties initiated a public debate on

the use of these compounds and a ban or reduction of their use in many regions

of the world. Macrocyclic musk compounds are expected to replace them since

these compounds appear to be safer.[

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Secretariat Wins the Triple Crown (1973)

Thoroughbred racehorse Secretariat was the first US Triple Crown champion in 25 years, setting records in the Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes that still stand today. In fact, in the 40 years since, only one Derby winner has even come close to matching Secretariat's time of 1:59.40. Secretariat advanced from last to first to win the Preakness and won the Belmont Stakes by an unprecedented 31 lengths. What controversy arose regarding the time calculations of the 1973 Preakness?

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Secretariat Wins the Triple Crown (1973)

Thoroughbred racehorse Secretariat was the first US Triple Crown champion in 25 years, setting records in the Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes that still stand today. In fact, in the 40 years since, only one Derby winner has even come close to matching Secretariat's time of 1:59.40. Secretariat advanced from last to first to win the Preakness and won the Belmont Stakes by an unprecedented 31 lengths. What controversy arose regarding the time calculations of the 1973 Preakness?
 
 
The Preakness Stakes[edit]

In the Preakness Stakes, Secretariat broke last, but then made a huge, last-to-first move on the first turn. After reaching the lead with 512 furlongs to go, he was never challenged, and won by 2½ lengths, again with Sham finishing second and Our Native third.

The time of the race was controversial. The infield teletimer displayed a time of 1:55. The track's electronic timer had malfunctioned because of damage caused by members of the crowd crossing the track to reach the infield. The Pimlico Race Course clocker, E.T. McLean Jr., announced a hand time of 1:5425. However, two Daily Racing Form clockers claimed the time was 1:5325, which would have broken the track record (1:54 by Cañonero II). Tapes of Secretariat and Cañonero II were played side by side by CBS, and Secretariat got to the finish line first on tape, though this is not a reliable method of timing a horse race at the time. The Maryland Jockey Club, which managed the Pimlico racetrack and is responsible for maintaining Preakness records, discarded both the electronic and Daily Racing Form times and recognized 1:5425 as the official time. However, Daily Racing Form, for the first time in history, printed its own clocking of 1:5325 next to the official time in the chart of the race.

On June 19, 2012, a special meeting of the Maryland Racing Commission was convened at Laurel Park at the request of Penny Chenery, who hired companies to conduct a forensic review of the videotapes of the race. After over two hours of testimony, the commission unanimously voted to change the time of Secretariat's win from 1:5425 to 1:53, establishing a new stakes record. The Daily Racing Form then announced that it would honor the commission's ruling with regard to the running time.[3]

As Secretariat prepared for the Belmont Stakes, he appeared on the covers of three national magazines: Time, Newsweek, and Sports Illustrated. He had become a national celebrity.

 
FYI:

Death[edit]

In the fall of 1989, Secretariat was afflicted with laminitis—a painful and often incurable hoof condition. When his condition failed to improve after a month of treatment, he was euthanized on October 4 at the age of 19.[33] Secretariat was buried at Claiborne Farm in Paris, Kentucky, given the rare honor of being buried whole (usually only the head, heart, and hooves of a winning race horse are buried, and the rest of the body is cremated).

A necropsy revealed his heart was significantly larger than that of an ordinary horse.[32] An extremely large heart is a trait that occasionally occurs in Thoroughbreds, linked to a genetic condition passed down via the dam line, known as the "x-factor".[32][34][35][36] The x-factor can be traced to the historic racehorse Eclipse, which was necropsied after his death in 1789. Because Eclipse's heart appeared to be much larger than other horses, it was weighed, and found to be 14 pounds (6.4 kg), almost twice the normal weight. Eclipse is believed to have passed the trait on via his daughters, and pedigree research verified that Secretariat traces in his dam line to a daughter of Eclipse.[32] In the 20th century, the heart of Phar Lap was weighed and also documented to be 6.35 kilograms (14.0 lb),[37] or essentially the same size as that of Eclipse.

At the time of Secretariat's death, the veterinarian who performed the necropsy, Dr. Thomas Swerczek, head pathologist at the University of Kentucky, did not weigh Secretariat's heart, but stated, "We just stood there in stunned silence. We couldn’t believe it. The heart was perfect. There were no problems with it. It was just this huge engine."[33] Later, Swerczek also performed a necropsy on Sham, who died in 1993. Swerczek did weigh Sham's heart, and it was 18 pounds (8.2 kg). Based on Sham's measurement, and having necropsied both horses, he estimated Secretariat's heart probably weighed 22 pounds (10.0 kg),[32] or about two-and-three-quarters times as large as that of the average horse.

 

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