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Pablo Martín Melitón de Sarasate y Navascués (1844)

Sarasate was a Spanish violinist and composer. He began studying the violin with his bandmaster father at age five, and at his first public concert at age eight, he impressed a wealthy patron and was sent to study in Madrid. There, Queen Isabel II gave him the Stradivarius violin that he would play for the rest of his life. He made his Paris debut in 1860 and commenced touring the world. He wrote scores of brilliant virtuoso works, some of which are still played today. Where are his violins now?
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Pablo Martín Melitón de Sarasate y Navascués (1844)

Sarasate was a Spanish violinist and composer. He began studying the violin with his bandmaster father at age five, and at his first public concert at age eight, he impressed a wealthy patron and was sent to study in Madrid. There, Queen Isabel II gave him the Stradivarius violin that he would play for the rest of his life. He made his Paris debut in 1860 and commenced touring the world. He wrote scores of brilliant virtuoso works, some of which are still played today. Where are his violins now?
 
Sarasate died in Biarritz, France, on 20 September 1908, from chronic bronchitis. He bequeathed his violin, made by Antonio Stradivari in 1724, to the Musée de la Musique. The violin now bears his name as the Sarasate Stradivarius in his memory. His second Stradivari violin, the Boissier of 1713, is now owned by Real Conservatorio Superior de Música, Madrid. (from Wikipedia)

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McKinley Morganfield, AKA Muddy Waters (1913)

As a teenager in Mississippi, Waters played traditional country blues, but after settling in Chicago in the 1940s, he switched to a more urban style with amplified instruments. He soon became known for his driving slide guitar technique and darkly expressive vocal style. From the 1950s on, Waters recorded, toured, and played various music festivals. His electric blues influenced myriad musicians, including Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan. What world-famous band took its name from one of his songs?
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Gerald Joseph "Gerry" Mulligan (1927)

Mulligan was an important baritone saxophonist and one of the best-known exponents of cool jazz, a delicate, understated offshoot of bebop. He began his career in the mid-1940s as an arranger for Gene Krupa and Claude Thornhill and played on the historic Miles Davis nonet recordings in 1949. He gained considerable success with the quartet he formed with Chet Baker in 1952, and he led ensembles of various sizes thereafter. Mulligan served jail time after he was arrested in 1953 for what?

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Gerald Joseph "Gerry" Mulligan (1927)

Mulligan was an important baritone saxophonist and one of the best-known exponents of cool jazz, a delicate, understated offshoot of bebop. He began his career in the mid-1940s as an arranger for Gene Krupa and Claude Thornhill and played on the historic Miles Davis nonet recordings in 1949. He gained considerable success with the quartet he formed with Chet Baker in 1952, and he led ensembles of various sizes thereafter. Mulligan served jail time after he was arrested in 1953 for what?
 
Possession of an illegal narcotic (heroin). He was convicted and did 6 months in a minimum security prison.
 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/jun/17/gerry-mulligan-gets-busted

 

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Eleanora Fagan, AKA Billie Holiday (1915)

Despite a deeply troubled upbringing, Holiday became one of the most celebrated and influential singers in jazz history. She was also one of its most tragic figures. She debuted in the 1930s and, after performing with Benny Goodman, Count Basie, and Artie Shaw, embarked on a successful solo career. However, she suffered many personal setbacks, complicated by the drug addiction that eventually destroyed her career and hastened her death. How did she choose her stage name?

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Eleanora Fagan, AKA Billie Holiday (1915)

Despite a deeply troubled upbringing, Holiday became one of the most celebrated and influential singers in jazz history. She was also one of its most tragic figures. She debuted in the 1930s and, after performing with Benny Goodman, Count Basie, and Artie Shaw, embarked on a successful solo career. However, she suffered many personal setbacks, complicated by the drug addiction that eventually destroyed her career and hastened her death. How did she choose her stage name?
 
"Billie" from her favorite actress Billie Dove, and "Holiday" from her father musician Clarence Halliday whose stage name was Clarence Holiday.

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Cigarette butts and filters take 12 years to biodegrade. An aluminum can takes between 200 to 500 years to biodegrade. Plastic diapers and sanitary pads take between 500-800 years. Styrofoam takes more than 5,000 years. And it would take a glass bottle 1 million years to biodegrade

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Herbert Jeffrey "Herbie" Hancock (1940)

Hancock is a jazz and funk pianist, composer, and bandleader who emerged as part of Miles Davis's group in the mid-1960s. An early adopter of electronic instruments, he became involved with funk and disco in the 70s, while continuing to tour with jazz groups, such as that of Wynton Marsalis. He won an Academy Award for his original score of the 1986 film 'Round Midnight and has won 14 Grammys, including "Album of the Year" for a work that paid tribute to what fellow musician?

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The Big Lebowski (1998 movie): What does the quote "Sometimes you eat the bar, and sometimes the bar eats you" mean?
(response from Sig Turner, quoted from Quora) 
This line is yet another example of the Coen Bros. genius as screenwriters. It is an especially clever double entendre. In one sense, the Stranger is merely eliciting the old adage “Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear eats you” with “bear” being pronounced as “bar” due to the Stranger’s southwestern drawl. However, in another sense, “bar” is an allusion to the Jungian model of the human psyche where the bar represents the divide between the conscious and the unconscious. Thus, the Stranger is also saying that sometimes the conscious mind is in control of the psyche, and sometimes the unconscious mind is in control. 
20170412172610658.jpg 
 *In case you haven’t yet noticed, the Jungian model of the psyche happens to resemble a bowling ball. This is no coincidence.
 
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Artur Schnabel (1882)

Schnabel was an Austrian-American pianist best known for his interpretations of Beethoven's piano works. Based in Berlin from 1900 to 1933, he composed, taught, and gave legendary performances of the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert for centenary celebrations. In the 1930s, he became the first to record the complete Beethoven cycle. During the Nazi period, he moved to London, then to the US. Though his own compositions are less known, they are revered by serious pianists. Why?

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Artur Schnabel (1882)

Schnabel was an Austrian-American pianist best known for his interpretations of Beethoven's piano works. Based in Berlin from 1900 to 1933, he composed, taught, and gave legendary performances of the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert for centenary celebrations. In the 1930s, he became the first to record the complete Beethoven cycle. During the Nazi period, he moved to London, then to the US. Though his own compositions are less known, they are revered by serious pianists. Why?
 
 
Schnabel's compositions are atonal (not centered around a specific key), complex and difficult making them a challenge to play.
 
 
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Eliot Ness (1903)

Ness was 26 years old when he was hired as a special agent of the US Department of Justice to head its Chicago Prohibition bureau, with the express purpose of breaking up the bootlegging network of Al Capone. He formed a nine-man team of unbribable officers known as "the Untouchables." Numerous attempts were made on his life, and one of his friends was killed, but he eventually helped take down Capone, who was convicted on tax evasion charges. What did Ness do after Prohibition ended?

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"What did Ness do after prohibition ended?" 
 
 
 
Ness was chosen as the chief investigator of the Chicago Prohibition Bureau until the Prohibition era ended. From there, he moved to Cincinnati's Justice Department where he was responsible for locating and destroying moonshine operations in the hills and mountains of Ohio, Kentucky and parts of Tennessee.
 
After several months, Ness landed a new job in December of 1935 as the investigator in charge of the Treasury Department's Alcoholic Tax Unit in northern Ohio. At age 32, he was the youngest in Cleveland history to claim that title. Mayor Harold Hitz Burton, who appointed Ness, sought to establish a safe environment in Cleveland, a city which had become overloaded with crime and corruption.
 
Along with 34 agents under him, he began efforts to clean up the city and its crooked policemen. Conducting most of the investigating himself, Ness gathered evidence of the criminal activity of various police officers and took this information before a grand jury in October of 1936. Fifteen officials were brought to trial including a deputy inspector, two captains, two lieutenants and a sergeant. Two hundred police officers were forced to turn in their resignations.
 
Ness's greatest achievement was in traffic control. Cleveland was notorious at that time for being the second-worst American city in traffic-related deaths and injuries, with an average of 250 deaths each year. Ness established a court designed for the sole purpose of handling traffic cases.
 
He also implemented the process of immediate examination of suspected drunk drivers, automatic arrest of those found intoxicated, harsh consequences for officers found adjusting tickets and an automobile inspection program.
 
By 1938, deaths caused by traffic accidents fell to an average of 130 per year, and fell even further in 1939 to 115. Ness's efforts resulted in Cleveland receiving the title of "safest city in the USA" by the National Safety Council.
 
 
 Image result for eliot ness quotes
 
Source:
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Peter Kenneth Frampton (1950)

British rocker Peter Frampton performed with successful bands The Herd and Humble Pie before going solo in 1971. His breakthrough album, 1976's Frampton Comes Alive!, remains one of the best-selling live albums of all time. It includes hits such as "Do You Feel Like We Do?" and "Show Me The Way," which feature his signature talk box effect that makes the guitar sound like it is "talking." Why did Frampton regret appearing on the cover of Rolling Stone at the height of his success?

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Peter Kenneth Frampton (1950)

British rocker Peter Frampton performed with successful bands The Herd and Humble Pie before going solo in 1971. His breakthrough album, 1976's Frampton Comes Alive!, remains one of the best-selling live albums of all time. It includes hits such as "Do You Feel Like We Do?" and "Show Me The Way," which feature his signature talk box effect that makes the guitar sound like it is "talking." Why did Frampton regret appearing on the cover of Rolling Stone at the height of his success?
 
 

 

Frampton said the shirt-less pop star cover image was a curse. "You can lose your male audience".

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Storm Chasing

Broadly defined as the pursuit of any severe weather condition, storm chasing is an endeavor with motives ranging from thrill-seeking to serious scientific research. Although witnessing a tornado is the primary goal for most storm chasers, many enjoy watching thunderstorms, hail, lightning, and other meteorological events as well. Storm chasers are most active in May and June in the American Great Plains region. Who is generally considered the first storm chaser?

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Oldsmobile Builds Its Last Car (2004)

Founded in 1897 by Ransom Olds, Oldsmobile—not Ford—was the first company to mass produce automobiles. After it became part of General Motors in 1908, it shifted to making luxury vehicles. Sales soared in the 1970s and 80s—the Cutlass was the top-selling car in America in 1976—but by the 90s, Oldsmobile had lost its market to other GM divisions. Amid declining profitability, GM discontinued the line in 2004 after 107 years. The first Oldsmobile was the Curved Dash. What was the last?
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