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First Gigabyte Hard Drive: The IBM 3380 HDA



IBM Hard Drive Assembly (HDA) unit for the 3380 series, first announced in June 1980.


☛ The University of Auckland – Department of Computer Science: Removable 1GB Hard Drive Assembly (HDA) from the IBM 3380 storage device series, announced in June 1980. Another image is available at Wikimedia Common. See also the video embedded below.


The photo shows a single hard drive assembly (HDA) used on the IBM 3380 Direct Access Storage Device (DASD), a series which IBM announced on June 19801. The 3380 series was a storage solution to be use alongside a computer (it was not a computer in itself). Each unit of the early models of the 3380 series (A4, A4F, AA4, AAF, B4 and BF4) was composed of two of those hard drives (or two HDAs). Each of them had a capacity of about 1.26GB, providing one storage device of the 3380 series with a total capacity 2.52GB.


Those were the very first hard drives to break the 1 gigabyte barrier, as explained on the website of the Department of Computer Science at The University of Auckland:



From the early 1960s most disks had platters 14 inches in diameter. This became a standard size for the high-end disks for over twenty years. The high point for the 14 in. disk came with the IBM 3380 (1981) with 9 platters and the breaking of the 1GByte barrier with a capacity of 1260 Mbytes. This device was also housed in the tallest largest cabinet ever used for a disk – truly the pinnacle of large disk development. The IBM 3380 continued in different versions until 1987 with the 3389K drive of 3781 MB capacity. (“Computing History Displays: Fifth Floor – Magnetic Data Storage – Magnetic Disk Storage”)



In an oral history of the IBM 3380 series recorded in 2006, engineers who have worked on it in the 80s reminded the “refrigerator size” of this first gigabyte storage device:



Mike Warner: About $120,000. And for these, and they stood in a meter wide, a meter deep, and two meter high assembly.


Jack Grogan: Called the refrigerator size.


Warner: Yeah, about a big refrigerator, a big, deep refrigerator. So it was extremely difficult to make this large a device, with all its mechanical complications reach the aerial densities and the technical objectives that we had. And we’ll go through that in the next hour or so. (Computer History Museum: “Oral History Panel on IBM 3380 Disk Drive”, interviewed by Jim Porter, recorded on January 3, 2006, Mountain View, California, ref. number X3413.2006, p. 4, PDF)



The weight of a single HDA such as the one depicted in the photo above was about 29 kilograms (roughly 64 pounds)2. The price for one of those 1.26GB HDA was about $50,000. The “Oral History Panel on IBM 3380 Disk Drive” hosted by the Computer History Museum website really is the most detailed documentation available online about the IBM’s 3380 series. IBM Archives also offers some detailed documentation about its 3380 series: “IBM 3380 direct access storage device” (PDF for archive purpose).


However, one of the best way to have a good look at this first gigabyte hard drive is to watch a 10 mins episode of Tested titled “Inside Adam Savage’s Cave: Geeking Out about Bits and Bytes” (Oct. 11, 2012). In this episode Adam Savage explains the difference between bits and bytes and shows what they looked like when they were made out of vacuum tubes. At about 4’14″ he presents a HDA unit from the 3380 series ―which he managed to buy on eBay― and talks about it.



For more related documents, consider the following links:



• • •


1. Although the 3380 was announced in June 1980, due to technical problems the first units of the 3380 series finally shipped on October 1981. See Computer History Museum: “Oral History Panel on IBM 3380 Disk Drive”, interviews by Jim Porter, recorded on January 3, 2006, Mountain View, California, ref. number X3413.2006, p. 2 (PDF). IBM also gives 1980 as the date for the introduction of the 3380 series: “20th century disk storage chronology” and “IBM 3380 DASD with IBM 3880”


2.I have got the weight of the 3380 series HDA unit from Newcastle University’s Virtual Museum of Computing Artefacts: see “IBM 3380 Disk Drive”. In the video episode ofTested Adam Savage weights the unit he bought at 75 pounds.




• By Philippe Theophanidis on May 6, 2013 ― Published in CommunicationTechnology | Tagged: computer,datagigabyteIBMinformationmemorystorage 



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voce_audio_system.jpg
 
The Voce Audio and MSB Room at T.H.E. Show 2013:
 
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"FURIOUS: Voce Audio at THE show

Voce Audio speakers appeared in two rooms at two decidedly disparate system price points. An MSB-based system put up by One World Audio featured the following MSB products; Data CD IV Disc Player with Power Base ($7,490), Analogue DAC with volume control ($7,990), 203 Monoblocks ($27,500/pr). An Auraliti L1000 Music File Server ($5K) was employed for file playback. The analogue front end was headed by the Scheu Premier MkIII table ($4,425), and 9” Tacco Tonearm (3,995) with Soundsmith Hyperion OCL Phono Cartridge ($7,500). All cables and power distribution were from WyWires Gold and Silver Series, the loom and conditioning total was approximately $10,800. The system was driving the Voce VA-3s Speakers ($29,575/pr), which were sitting upon Stillpoints Ultra 5 support ($6,060). Total system cost was $118,600. "

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20140310124230620.jpeg
 
The Most Powerful Tube Amplifier Ever Built? 
The NAT Audio Magma is capable of blasting its raw power at 4 or 8 ohms with a frequency response of 10-10,000 Hz. To produce this power the Magma relies on three different tubes: the 6N1P-EV, the 6N30P-DR, and the Eimac 450TH.
 
In order to handle this power, the Magma utilizes an unusual direct-heated NOS amp design that runs into a DC-coupled all-tube circuit, which allows the amp to achieve a damping factor of 20. In addition, the power and output transformers are rated for 1000 watts, and the power supply capacitance is over 500 joules. The Magma weighs in at 88 lbs. and will set you back $55,000 for a pair of the monoblock amplifiers.
 
Specifications:
  • Type: Single Ended Class “A”
  • Power Output: 160 Watts @ 4 & 8 ohms; 1 kHz
  • Frequency Response: 10 Hz to 100 kHz; -3dB
  • Input Impedance: 100 kohms
  • Input Sensitivity: 2.7 V RMS for full power output
  • Gain: 22.50 dB at 8 ohm
  • Rise Time: 5 microseconds
  • Noise: 105 dB below rated output
  • Phase Status: Non inverting (0 degrees)
  • Tube Complement: 1x 6N1P-EV, 1 x 6N30P-DR , 1 x 450 TH
  • Power Requirement: 110 VAC or 220 VAC @ 50 to 60 Hz, 450 VA
  • Dimensions: 11.8″ wide x 25.2″ deep x 14.2″ high
  • NET Weight: approx. 88 lbs per piece
  • Price: $55,000 per pair
 
 
Features:
  • Single Ended pure class A mono block power amplifier
  • Eimac power industrial type direct heated triode 450TH (N.O.S.)
  • DC coupled all tube circuit (only output transformer without capacitors)
  • CE comfortable
  • 160 W of pure class A @4ohms or @8ohms
  • Low global feedback configuration with damping factor of 20
  • High capacity in power supply resulting to over 500joules of energy storage
  • Custom designed power transformer of 1000W encapsulated-low density
  • Custom designed output transformer of 1000W encapsulatedlast generation
  • Full double stabilization of high voltage for driver tubes
  • 6N1P-EV & 6N30P-DR long life military grade tubes for driver purposes
  • Full automatic bias with automatic-adjust (no any adjustment).
  • Variable bias (two mode with 40W & 160W of output power)
  • Balanced DC power to supply filament of output tube
  • Balanced regulated DC power to supply filament for driver tubes
  • Both input and output WBT connectors
  • Input wired with pure 6N silver (99,9999% of silver purity)
  • All aluminum modulated chassis with double 25mm thick front panel 

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20140310124230620.jpeg
 
The Most Powerful Tube Amplifier Ever Built? 
The NAT Audio Magma 

 
I guess they hadn't heard of a little tube amp called... "The Silver Seven"? emwink.gif
 
Even if they're only counting commercially available SET designs, I still doubt at 140 watts it's the most powerful ever. 

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Nice! Why settle with 4 subs when you can have 6.... emsmilep.gif
 
Where do you find these amazing systems day after day? I need a drool bib! and what is the value of so many
subs.  I have one sub, would 2 or more make a significant difference?

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I just like the glass speakers! I want to see somebody fill them with fish that swim around- that would be pimp. happy0009.gif  Undoubtably they'd be bass... 

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Nice! Why settle with 4 subs when you can have 6.... emsmilep.gif
 
Where do you find these amazing systems day after day? I need a drool bib! and what is the value of so many
subs.  I have one sub, would 2 or more make a significant difference?

 
When smoothing out room response, multiple subs in different areas of the room may be just what the doctor ordered.
 

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