Jump to content
Gene C

Favorite Pictures

Recommended Posts

 

 

 

_5645444_orig.jpg

 

What are the cylindrical, clear-plexiglas (???) tuned-resonance devices behind and to the sides of the main speakers?  Is that some kind of "bass-absorber"?
 
I guess that's supposed to be the "dead end" of the room.  Looks spooky to me--but what the hell do I know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zoom posted a pic of Steel Yard in another thread, but with the recent Cold War theme in this thread, I was already going to post a pic of it myself:
 
 20140304133602766.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Zoom posted a pic of Steel Yard in another thread, but with the recent Cold War theme in this thread, I was already going to post a pic of it myself:
 
 20140304133602766.jpeg
Chernobyl 2 Radar Antenna (aka The Russian Woodpecker)
In the woods about 10 kilometres south from Chernobyl nuclear power plant there is a top secret object, Chernobyl-2. It's one of three Soviet 'over the horizon' radar stations of the system of early detection against attacks of ballistic rockets. This system was beginning to be developed in the Soviet Union in the 1950's during the cold war. First experimental devices of this type started to originate in the Soviet Union during the 1960's, however, they skirmished with a number of technical problems and were not able to really capture the danger, therefore, questions of their ability to operate in the enemies area were not solved. The first really functional systems were successfully designed at the end of the 1960's.
 
The first experimental system DUGA-1 (Дуга) has been constructed near the town Mikolaiv (Миколаїв) in Ukraine and was able to successfully discover rocket launches from cosmodrome Bajkonur, over 2500 km away. This system was followed by a second prototype DUGA-2, which was built in the same place. It was possible to monitor the launch of the rockets from the Far East and a movement of submarines in the Pacific Ocean. Both systems levelled at East and were a relatively small delivery. However, works on operation system DUGA-3 has started with a proven concept, which turned to West and was also called The Moscow Eye – this were objects Komsomolsk on Amur (Комсомольск на Амуре) and Chernobyl-2. DUGA 3 was supposed to facilitate monitoring of space in Europe as well as potential enemies targets in North America.
 
The metal construction of the radar aerial is composed of two parts, a low-frequency antenna with a height of 135 – 150 meters and length of almost 500 meters. There's also a high-frequency antenna with a height of 100 meters and length of 250 meters. Obviously the antenna also had a few other supporting buildings for technical tasks, the operating technique and the control centre of the radar. The object is easily visible even from a far due to is huge size. It is also necessary to mention that this device was only a receiver and to this receiver belongs a broadcaster antenna, which is located in Chernihiv area (Чернігівська область) in the complex Lubech (Любеч) 60 kilometres from Chernobyl. This antenna was not as large as the receiver and it was removed in the 1990's
 
DUGA radar required for its functioning high input about 10 Mw. Among other things, but also because of this it is located in the neighborhood of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, which started to be built simultaneously with it. According to some sources the costs of the radar was about 7milliard Soviet rubles. To give an example of the cost, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant cost only half this.
 
It was found out during examinable operation in the 1970's and 80's that it is necessary to solve the problem of disturbing frequencies. While operating they disturbed radio frequencies beyond that of the Soviet Union and this characteristic sound was nicknamed in western countries as the Russian Woodpecker.
 
It was also necessary to solve the problem with concourse of working frequencies of DUGA and civil air forces. These problems were solved by modernisation of the system in 1985 – 1986 and afterwards the system was officially adopted as a part of the air protection of SSSR.
 
After the adoption in 1986 the functioning was interrupted because of the accident to the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26th April 1986 and to the end of 1987 the system was partially preserved. Consequently together with the final decision of closing the zone in the surrounding of the nuclear power plant, the operation was also finally closed. Some important and expensive parts of the system were removed and moved to the object Komsomolsk in Amur. At this present time, the object Chernobyl-2 is left abandoned to the same fate as other objects inside the closed Chernobyl zone.

  • Thank You 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, Dom...you rule.
This, along with many other abandoned Cold war relics,, is a spooky place.
750px-Woodpecker_array.jpg
 
haarp40_05.jpg
 
Russianwoodpecker.jpg
All of these buildings are abandoned, of course, and like many from Soviet Russia, are made from concrete, so they will be there for millennium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites





maxresdefault.jpg

Ok, so these drivers must nearly dead short to require monoblocks THAT large.......
Dom??  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my favorite picture..., but worthy. It's snowing again today. 80 inches this year, and it's probably not over (average is 20 to 30 inches).
20140305065833439.jpg 
The snowbank in the back of this photo, below..., you know the phrase: "There's a basketball hoop (pony) in there somewhere.  For the record, there's no joy in shoveling snow...  Yikes
20140305070139468.jpg 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stickers

 

 

Not my favorite picture..., but worthy. It's snowing again today. 80 inches this year, and it's probably not over (average is 20 to 30 inches).
20140305065833439.jpg 
The snowbank in the back of this photo, below..., you know the phrase: "There's a basketball hoop (pony) in there somewhere.  For the record, there's no joy in shoveling snow...  Yikes
 
We're at 110" in GR,MI dude. Third most snowfall in the country for cities over 100k people.
 It's gonna be wet here the next time it rains hard......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

20140305153632406.jpeg
 
20140305153723815.jpeg 
20140305153810470.jpeg 
Marx Generator at the Siberian Power Research Institute at Novosibirsk, Siberia
 
A Marx generator is an electrical circuit first described by Erwin Otto Marx in 1924. Its purpose is to generate a high-voltage pulse from a low-voltage DC supply. Marx generators are used in high energy physics experiments, as well as to simulate the effects of lightning on power line gear and aviation equipment. A bank of 36 Marx generators is used by Sandia National Laboratories to generate X-rays in their Z Machine. 
 
Marx_Generator.svg 

  • Thank You 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Marx generator is in Russia, as Dom pointed out. At the (now abandoned) SIBNIIE test facility. 
20140305163948684.jpg 
 
Some of the largest manmade sparks have been produced there. The spark in the post above was about 500 feet long, produced by 5 million volts. The facility tested high voltage transmission gear:
 
20140305164245637.jpg 
There's a Marx generator in Istra, Russia that's even bigger! 
 
You think you've had a bad day when you find a blown cap?:
 
20140305164404534.jpg  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...