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Nothing like making more work for myself....


itchitch
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I got ambitious this weekend in the back bedroom:
 
Popped the covers off of most of my gear and took them to be powder coated.
 
The perfect opportunity to pull the face plates off...
- Dismantle lens assembly
- Clean/polish lens
- Replace lens brackets with aluminum brackets (when they are ready...they have been ordered.) 
- Reassemble the best parts of each
  
I have not started on the two that are in my home theater yet.
 
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Wow, Steve.

 

That looks like an M500t assembly line!

Come to think of it, you are literally sleeping with your Carver equipment. That takes occd to a "HNL". You have set a new standard.

 

Unbelievable--& talk about horsepower.

 

I take it you are going to power a 7.1 system with that number?

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Itch - you are truly an inspiration for all. I admire the way you have tackled this challenge and the intensity you are putting into it - no shortcuts in your agenda! Your pictures underscore the thoroughness of this undertaking. Henry Ford never had a bedroom laid out like yours.

 

Keep us posted on your progress and congratulations as we all know these components are going to be phenomenal. Nice work Dad!

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Thanks guys.

 

As far as the aluminum brackets:

I asked my BIL to start production on a batch.

It's a "favor" to me so I don't have an eta.

 

I will keep everyone informed.

 

Itch

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If you are planning to mix M-500's with M-500t's in an HT system keep in mind they have different sensitivities.
If I recall correctly the M-500 is more sensitive than the M-500t. Let me see if I can find a reference for you.
 
Here you go:


....I was doing an M-500 and forgot the sensitivities were different (M-500 is more sensitive), so when you put 1V into an M-500, you get ~140W out (versus 100W for a M-500t)....
 
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Another way of putting it is that the M-500 has a gain of about 29db.  The M-500t is 26db.
 
Service manual specs state M-500 input of 1.4v will get you 200watts (40 volts into 8 ohms).  M-500t needs 2v for the same output. 
 
Most carver amps have a gain the the 30db range. 
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If you are planning to mix M-500's with M-500t's in an HT system keep in mind they have different sensitivities.
If I recall correctly the M-500 is more sensitive than the M-500t. Let me see if I can find a reference for you.
Here you go:

 

....I was doing an M-500 and forgot the sensitivities were different (M-500 is more sensitive), so when you put 1V into an M-500, you get ~140W out (versus 100W for a M-500t)....

 

Thanks for the heads up. My plan is to sell the 500's.

The HT contains just one 500t for the main fronts. The other seven channels are powered by a TGA-7401.

The other 500t's are for several audio systems in the house.

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  • 3 weeks later...
All of the lenses have been removed from the face plates!
The adhesive that was used looks to be a two sided tape of some type.
I think the years have degraded it and on a few of the units actually etched the metal. I used a razor blade to remove the lenses from the face plates. I found
that I was better off not using and GooGone unless absolutely necessary. Even the smallest amount begins to travel between the face plate and the lens towards the LETTERING. I hate knives and razors and all I could think about was the amount of pressure required on the razor to remove the lens... SLIP - blood - Emergency room.
 
I used a random orbital buffer and the 1-2-3 system on each lens.
Fearful of burning the plastic I used low rpm's and went over each three times with each "step."
 
Each lens was placed on white paper as you can see in the photo. I plan on mapping out any imperfections
and noting them on the paper. This will allow me to go back and redo the process on the lenses I wish to
"perfect."
 
I am not surprised by the color variations of the lenses (are you?!) Are the variations due to age, exposure to heat or sun or just OEM issues... who knows, maybe all of the above. (No it's not the lighting.)
 
Next step...
 
Prepare the face plates for reattachment of the lenses. I will be using my four remaining pair of aluminum  brackets on my MK II units. I was fortunate that none of the plastic brackets broke (yet) in the  removal process! 
 
I have found that a "less industrial" double sided tape is sufficient to keep the lens in place once installed.
 
Itch
 
 
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You are making great progress Steve. Wax on, wax off. face20.gif
 
Next time try placing a towel dampened with IPA on the adhesive residue. After 10-15 minutes it should be soft enough to remove with a plastic scraper or toothpick.
 
I believe the acrylic lenses are lightly tinted ("smoked") so the variations could be due to poor quality control. Not sure what happened to the rose tinted one....
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[...]
Next time try placing a towel dampened with IPA on the adhesive residue. After 10-15 minutes it should be soft enough to remove with a plastic scraper or toothpick.
[...]
When I first read this, I was thinking..., wet the towel, soak the residue, drink the rest of the IPA (takes about 15 minutes), ... remove softened residue... Party!
 
20170219062919663.jpg    vs.   20170219063015427.jpg
 
(this is humor..., don't drink the second IPA...) 
 
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Some progress (four down, five to go.)
 
I Q-tipped the hell out of each face plate (every nook and cranny.)
 
Cleaned the back and front of each.
 
Applied double sided tape (sparingly.) 
 
Positioned  LENS and attached with aluminum brackets with new screw,  added washer over existing washer.
 
20170220154629420.jpg 
 
 20170220154708893.jpg
 
 
 
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20170220154816950.jpg 
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Quote
Some progress (four down, five to go.)
 
I Q-tipped the hell out of each face plate (every nook and cranny.)
 
Cleaned the back and front of each.
 
Applied double sided tape (sparingly.) 
 
Positioned  LENS and attached with aluminum brackets with new screw,  added washer over existing washer.
 
 
 
Now you are making more work for others... face20.gif 
 
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Was thinking the same thing LT!

 

Hey itch, looking good, have you thought about taking faceplate measurements while disassembled!

 

I was thinking a black faceplate with built in handles would match the rest of my rack!

 

BarryG

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Steve, your work is paying off.  Those faceplates look brand new!  I would even consider one for my system--as picky as I am.   Big Grin.. 
 
 OCCD  OCCD  OCCD  OCCD  OCCD
...and that bedroom picture is the essence of OCCD !
 OCCD OCCD     OCCD  OCCD  OCCD
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I picked up my 500(t) covers from the powder coater.
 
I wish they were all perfect but did find a few that have marks where they must have suspended the covers in order to paint them. Two have a few nicks. I didn't realize how many had a slight bow in them, probably due to stacking over the years. Imperfections and all, I am pretty satisfied.
 
I decided to experiment with the first one. I bought some snap covers for the screws. The #6 cover is a pretty tight fit over the pan head. The #8 allows you to use an OEM washer inside of it. I elected to use the #6 without the washer for the units that will be sans handles. Anyone think of downside to not using the washers?
 
I think these give the amp a "finished" look, especially if they will not be in a cabinet.
 
Sorry for the crap pictures...need to take some in the daytime. 
 
Itch 
 
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I decided to experiment with the first one. I bought some snap covers for the screws. The #6 cover is a pretty tight fit over the pan head. The #8 allows you to use an OEM washer inside of it. I elected to use the #6 without the washer for the units that will be sans handles. Anyone think of downside to not using the washers?
 
Curious, if there are Metric covers since the screw is a M4.0.
 
If the cover screw is overtightened, the washer can leave marks on the cover. 
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I decided to experiment with the first one. I bought some snap covers for the screws. The O cover is a pretty tight fit over the pan head. The S allows you to use an OEM washer inside of it. I elected to use the O without the washer for the units that will be sans handles. Anyone think of downside to not using the washers?
Curious, if there are Metric covers since the screw is a M4.0.
If the cover screw is overtightened, the washer can leave marks on the cover.

 

The plastic caps act as a washer and protect the finish...

 

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Looking good Steve! emthup.gif
 
It's pretty easy to straighten sheet metal covers though I usually do that BEFORE I paint them. emwink.gif
Lay the cover convex side up on a flat, compressible surface. (A layer or 2 of tool box liner works great.)
Place a piece of wood (1 x 4 or 2 x 4) parallel to and on top of the apex of the bow and press gently.
Check your cover for flatness and if necessary repeat the procedure with a bit more pressure until it's flat.
 
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