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Quantum Gravity Limits from Planet Observations

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The force of gravity, explained using Einstein’s general theory of relativity, can be associated with a particle called the graviton that is thought to have zero mass. One way to check if the particle is really massless is to calculate an upper limit on its mass from detailed observations of planetary motions in the Solar System. Now a team has improved upon a previous effort to do this by avoiding a hidden assumption in the earlier work. Any sign that the mass might not be zero could suggest that new theories beyond general relativity are required.

 

https://physics.aps.org/articles/v12/113

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That sucked me right in................

I think I'll add the gravitron to my selection in "Rock, paper,scissors" selection. It will deform the paper so it can't be cut straight, accelerates a rock away from the holder, and deforms the scissors if I have a few extra.

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The world of what used to be called particle physics is very intriguing  We're starting to get into an era were prior knowledge, which seemed to only answer a question with 10 more questions, i s starting to organize that knowledge into a cohesive doctrine.

 

Case in point is the Graviton postulate (and the recent Higgs Boson discovery).  Currently, the only way to interact with natural forces is via particle interactions, so particle physics take a front seat.  More important than the particles, however, has become the fields responsible for their existence.  So QED (quantum electrodynamics) and QCD (quantum chromodynamics) have given way to QFT (quantum field theory).

 

e.g. The recent discovery of the Higgs Boson wasn't very important as being a 'carrier' for mass, rather it was very important in proving the existence of a Higgs field, which imparts mass to other sub-atomic particles.

 

Likewise, the Graviton, if it is ever found (it's currently a speculation), would be more important as evidence of a Gravitometric field than as a 'carrier' particle

 

Hopefully, someday, we will discover how to interact with fields directly, and not have to shoe-horn new observations into the particle model (which is heavily confirmed by observation, but limited in its scope of comprehension)

Edited by RichP714

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