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Gene C

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You beat me to the punch, dazed! emteeth.gif
 
That's a great little tutorial you put together. We should sticky that! 

 
It's easy to get lost when those windows start popping up emsmilep.gif
 
I don't know how different the process is on a smartphone, 'cos I don't have one!

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Nice! Why settle with 4 subs when you can have 6.... emsmilep.gif
 
Where do you find these amazing systems day after day? I need a drool bib! and what is the value of so many
subs.  I have one sub, would 2 or more make a significant difference?

I can surely say (with 4)  that yes, 2 or more makes a significant difference. 
My highest db rating comes at the loudest bass notes.   I have to be careful when opening kitchen cupboards for fear of getting attacked by glassware.
Damn, those 500s look kickass. 
Very nice sir.  My 500 needs freshening up badly.

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If only my daily driver was jacked up like that. face20.gif
 
IMG_0377.jpg

 
Remembered you're an RC guy Gene......have you seen this video???
 
)
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That video was fucking awesome!

 

G3ne, if your ride was shod like that, the ride would be horrendous, not to mention the fuel economy~

 

 

If only my daily driver was jacked up like that. face20.gif
IMG_0377.jpg

Remembered you're an RC guy Gene......have you seen this video???
)

 

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My son Zack (back row,center) and the Matoaca HS Show Choir Band after winning their 4th "best band" award in a row. 

 
Kewl Dom,  Kids make life worth living for, and their accomplishments contribute to self worth. msp_thumbup.gif

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albumnight_nola_lg.jpg
Nola Grand Reference speakers in Lyric Hi-Fi & Video listening room
Lyric Hi-Fi & Video Wants to Blow Your Mind at ‘Classic Album Night’
February 22, 2008 by Arlen Schweiger
 
I might have to make a special trip from Massachusetts down to New York City. Specialty A/V dealer Lyric Hi-Fi & Video has scheduled a monthly series called “Classic Album Night” that is sure to give attendees a listening experience unlike any other they’ve had. Set for the second thursday of the month, the lineup of classic albums is, well, classic—the grouping would be pretty much in my pantheon of music, including Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, the Grateful Dead’s American Beauty and the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. See full schedule below (and while we’re at it, a shout out to Stephen Mejias’ entertaining Stereophile Blog for listing this).
 
If the music itself isn’t star-studded enough for you, the A/V gear should be. Lyric has put together a stunning list of components for a “mid six figures” system to give listeners a mind-blowing two-channel experience for these albums. According to Lyric’s website, the lineup will include Hansen Audio’s flagship King V2, the four-column Nola Grand Reference system, electronics from ASR, Audio Research, Halcro, Mark Levinson and McIntosh, a VPI turntable, and cabling from Nordost.
 
The room environment is top notch as well, as Listening Room A was designed from a collaboration that included Lyric founder Michael Kay and veteran audiophiles Dick Sequerra, Mitchell Cotter and Mark Levinson.
 
Attendance is free, but seating is limited, so if you want to check this out give a call to Bob Herman or Mike Deutsch at 212-439-1900 for a required reservation. Lyric is located at 1221 Lexington Ave. in Manhattan. 

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20140312124950546.jpeg
Delay Line Memory: How Computers Remembered Before RAM
 
Before there was random access memory, there was delay line memory. It was random in a different sense; it involved turning electrical pulses into sound waves, sending them through long tubes of mercury, and re-electrifying them at the other end. The technology had its roots in the work of engineer J. Presper Eckert, who developed line delay systems to improve radar during World War II. Instead of storing data in individual bits, it was compressed down to sound waves and sent through a medium that slowed them down (initially mercury, then other substances, and finally wire). At the other end, they were re-electrified, processed, and then sent back through the tube. Because of slowing that occurred in the tube's substance, hundreds of pulses of data could be sent in a single tube—hence the name "delay line"—bouncing back and forth until they were needed.
 
This post on Make offers a helpful analogy: If you had a hard time remembering things for very long, and happened to live in a cave, you could just shout out what you didn't want to forget, and a few seconds later you would hear an echo to remind you. Of course, the problem with this is that an echo doesn't stick around for long, so you would have to shout again every time that you heard the echo, so that you could remember again in a few seconds. Assuming you could keep this up, you would never forget your idea. 

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20140312124950546.jpeg
Delay Line Memory: How Computers Remembered Before RAM
 
Before there was random access memory, there was delay line memory. It was random in a different sense; it involved turning electrical pulses into sound waves, sending them through long tubes of mercury, and re-electrifying them at the other end. The technology had its roots in the work of engineer J. Presper Eckert, who developed line delay systems to improve radar during World War II. Instead of storing data in individual bits, it was compressed down to sound waves and sent through a medium that slowed them down (initially mercury, then other substances, and finally wire). At the other end, they were re-electrified, processed, and then sent back through the tube. Because of slowing that occurred in the tube's substance, hundreds of pulses of data could be sent in a single tube—hence the name "delay line"—bouncing back and forth until they were needed.

 
The delay line was needed for radar, to remove all the "clutter" caused by reflections from stationary objects. Two pulses are sent, one right after the other. The first return, from the first pulse, is sent through the delay line, then subtracted from the return from the second pulse when it arrives. Echoes from stationary objects are the same from both pulses; the difference represents objects that moved.
 
Mercury worked well for acoustic delay lines, because it had (under precise conditions) the same acoustical impedance as the piezoelectric transducers at either end of the line. This minimized losses and noise. 
 
The delay line in the picture is from the UNIVAC 1 computer in 1951, filled a room (including its support equipment), and was a whopping 1k of RAM. 

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W%C3%A4rtsil%C3%A4-18V50SG.jpg
 
That's gonna be tough to fit in an RC truck emwink.gif :


The new Wärtsilä 18V50SG gas engine sets a new standard for power generation

The new Wärtsilä 18V50SG spark-ignited gas engine has been developed in response to the market need for larger gas engines to run power plants with outputs of up to 500 MW. It has the same proven gas technology as the smaller Wärtsilä 34SG engine, with substantial improvements to maximize the power potential of the engine block, thereby increasing the output of the Wärtsilä spark-ignited series to more than 18 MW per unit.

The efficiency of the Wärtsilä 50SG is the highest of any spark-ignited gas engine available today. The natural gas fuelled, lean-burn, medium-speed engine is a reliable, high-efficiency and low-pollution power source for baseload, intermediate peaking, and combined cycle power plants.

The Wärtsilä 18V50SG is a four-stroke, spark-ignited gas engine that works according to the Otto process and the lean burn principle. The engine has ported gas admission and a pre-chamber with a spark plug for ignition. The engine runs at 500 or 514 rpm for 50 or 60 Hz applications, and produces 18,810 and 19,260 kW of mechanical power respectively. At generator terminals, this corresponds to 18,321 kWe and 18,759 kWe of electrical power.

The Wärtsilä 50SG meets current and future requirements for overall cost of ownership with very high simple and combined cycle efficiency. It is designed for easy maintenance and many hours of maintenance-free operation.

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